Community Conservation Resilience Initiative (CCRI): adaptable to different nations and contexts

Description of the project: The Community Conservation Resilience Initiative (CCRI) aims to assess the legal, political, moral, socio-economic, financial, technical and capacity-building support that is required to sustain and strengthen the resilience of community conservation and restoration initiatives in different communities around the world. The methodology is a simple guiding framework meant to be adapted to specific nation and local contexts. It includes a gender toolkit to identify and address potential forms of marginalization of women through dialogue within communities about women’s unique rights, roles, needs and aspirations.

Climate impact: Many of the different communities at the study sites are going through severe weather changes; some have managed to successfully adapt – or are adapting – to such changes by using their traditional knowledge and practices. Women are key knowledge-holders, allowing entire communities to overcome the different challenges. For instance, in Samoa, strong self-organized women groups have established mangrove recovery programs by planting up to 2 acres of mangrove trees, which help the community face tidal waves, sea rising and ultimately help restore the rich biodiversity providing food, medicine, and income to the local populations.

Gender impact: In many areas, patriarchal societies settled after colonization and the key role of women in community conservation is now invisible. For instance, in Ethiopia, women have lost most of their inheritance rights; but some traditions remain, bringing women’s key role back: ie. In Mount Bale women inherit from their mothers a “Singe”- stick as a symbol of respect. This community observes strict non-violence rules for women. The CCRI intends to visualize the gender aspects of community conservation and is paving the pathways to empower women to take on leadership roles.

Scalability / replicability: The CCRI is conducted in 22 countries around the world. The results of this experiment will contribute to the implementation of the Convention on Biodiversity’s 2011–2020 Strategic Plan, and also to Aichi Targets and the proposed SDGs related to forests and climate change. It will provide policy advice on transformative, effective and appropriate forms of support for community conservation to foster climate change mitigation and resilience.

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Integrating Gender into Urban Climate Change Initiatives (GUCCI)

Description of the project: This pioneering project explores options for integrating gender and social aspects into urban climate policies in six pilot cities. It seeks to build capacity at local level and develop gender-responsive policy recommendations, in order to strengthen citizens’ ability to become involved in urban planning processes and implementation, and to enhance the effectiveness, inclusiveness and acceptance of mitigation and adaptation policies. It was launched in 2015, in partnership with All India Women’s Conference, GenderCC Southern Africa, Aksi! for gender, social & ecological justice and Solidaritas Perempuan (Indonesia), and is part of the International Climate Initiative (IKI).

Climate impact: The project helps local governments to enhance their climate responses by integrating social issues, e.g. poverty alleviation and gender equality, to make adaptation and mitigation more effective and viable, and create social and environmental co-benefits. Key issues and priorities are identified for each pilot city and strategies are developed to ensure that climate policies are more effective and respond to the needs and capacities of citizens, women and men, poor and marginalised groups.

Gender impact: The project partners have developed and apply GenderCC’s Gender Assessment & Monitoring of Mitigation and Adaptation (GAMMA) methodology. The assessment involves several steps, covering institutional setting and procedures, the range of a city’s climate policies and an in depth analysis of the gender impacts of selected measures. The partners will develop policy recommendations based on the results of GAMMA and implement concrete genderresponsive campaigns and projects in the pilot cities.

Scalability / replicability: The project is conducted in six pilot cities in countries of the Global South. It is replicable in urban areas in the Global South and, with minor modifications, applicable to cities in the Global North. The Gender Assessment & Monitoring of Mitigation and Adaptation (GAMMA) methodology can be applied by policy-makers, NGOs and community-based groups with the guidance of gender experts.

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Bringing climate and gender justice together where it makes a difference!

Description of the project: Until now, gender issues have rarely been addressed in urban climate policy. In order to close this gap, this project explores options for integrating gender & social aspects into climate policies in several pilot cities. It seeks to build capacity at the local level and develop gender-responsive policy recommendations with the aim of strengthening citizens’ capacity to become involved in local government planning processes and implementation, and to enhance the effectiveness, inclusiveness and acceptance of mitigation & adaptation policies. It is a collaboration between GenderCC, All India Women’s Conference, Aksi! for gender, social & ecological justice (Indonesia), & GenderCC Southern Africa.

Climate Impact: Urban action on climate change is receiving growing attention, with cities increasingly considered to be key actors for the implementation of climate policy. As urban settlements expand rapidly in many parts of the world, many cities face the challenge of becoming more resilient to climate impacts and tackling rising emissions. Many cities are therefore currently developing and implementing strategies and policies to address climate change and its impacts. This project recognises that local governments therefore have a crucial opportunity to enhance their climate responses by integrating social issues such as poverty alleviation and gender equality, in order to make them more effective and viable, and to create social & environmental co-benefits. For each pilot city, key issues and priorities will be identified & local strategies developed.

Gender Impact: While progress has been made in addressing the nexus of climate change and gender, a lack of experience still exists when it comes to the specific challenges faced in urban contexts. To address this, the project partners are working together to develop a methodology to assess local policies on their ability to integrate gender aspects into adaptation and mitigation policies, seeking to identify areas that have to potential to bring together climate action and gender equality, such as providing access to clean and affordable energy and transport services. Activities conducted in the various pilot cities, including capacity building programmes and gender training for climate policy makers, will serve as a model for ongoing efforts to develop effective gender-responsive climate policies at local level.

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Women‘s equal participation in climate change decision-making is fundamental to just policies

Description of the project: Recognizing a need to support the participation and leadership of women in the UN climate negotiations, particularly from countries most affected by climate change, the Women Delegates Fund (WDF) was launched in 2009. The WDF works to enhance women’s participation in the climate negotiations in three key ways: 1) Travel support; 2) Capacity Building and Networking, and 3) Outreach and Advocacy. This is not a program aimed only at bringing women to the table, but in creating a stepchange in the power dynamics of the UN climate negotiations, and in all relevant bodies, towards one which encompasses women and men’s equal right to participate in decision-making.

Climate Impact: The impacts are both in terms of policy and political leadership of those supported. The period of the WDF programme has seen wide-ranging decisions on gender-responsive climate policy taken under the UNFCCC. Additionally, many WDF delegates have translated knowledge and experiences to the national level. For example, after participating in negotiations with the WDF, Anniete CohnLois of the Dominican Republic designed a project for women’s empowerment under her mission at the Vice President’s office. The project promotes women’s entrepreneurship in climate vulnerable areas of the Dominican Republic, supporting them in skills development, capacity-building and financial inclusion.

Gender Impact: Since 2009, the WDF has supported 218 trips for 54 women across 40 countries to attend 25 sessions of the UNFCCC. Among these, over 40% of funded delegates were the only women on their national delegations. During these sessions, nine ‘Night Schools’ have been held and a further 270 women have been trained in technical language and negotiations skills. In the last seven years, the number of total women delegates has increased from 31% to 35% in this time frame, and women Heads of Delegation has risen from 16% to 26%.

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Improving livelihoods in rural areas with safe and sustainable energy and sanitation – practical solutions

Description of the project: In the WECF energy and sanitation programme, decentralized solutions (solar water heaters, solar heating, solar fruit driers, biogas, insulation measures, sustainable sanitation solutions) are implemented by locally trained craftsmen and women, using local materials. By providing energy security in a sustainable way the project contributes to improved living conditions and health, reduces poverty and environmental degradation in rural areas in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Ukraine, Tajikistan and Uganda.

Climate Impact: The majority of the rural population in the project countries suffers from energy poverty and uses un-safe, fossil and traditional energy sources. By using fuel wood from unsustainably managed forests for heating, a rural household emits 6 -10 tons of CO2 annually. Technologies implemented by WECF and its partners provide safe, sustainable energy services, reducing household emissions up to 50%. Communities also become more climate resilient because there is less land degradation and deforestation. The programme also works on sustainable sanitation solutions that use less or no water compared with traditional alternatives.

Gender Impact: In the target regions, women have an unpaid labor burden in and around the house and have fewer opportunities to participate in economic and public activities. Women are traditionally responsible to produce heat and hot water and are exposed to indoor air pollution caused by the burning of unsafe fuel. Insufficient availability of warm water and appropriate sanitation for hygienic purposes likewise adversely affects women’s health. WECF fosters gender equality by 1. Reducing women’s and men’sunpaidlaborburden, improving women`s health and comfort by reducing indoor air pollution; 2. Ensuring that men and women participate equally in all project aspects, that women’s needs are taken into account, and empowering women to become promoters of safe, sustainable energy and improved hygiene; 3. Empowering women and men economically by saving money for fuel and creating jobs.

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Amplifying voice and influence: women transform the climate narrative

Description of the project: This project, as part of WEDO’s broader work on mobilizing women for climate justice, provides mentorship and media training for women from frontline communities including indigenous, rural, and grassroots leaders across 8 regions. Goals are: 1. to build the capacity of individual women environmental defenders to pitch and share their local stories of resilience and innovation, thus crafting a narrative of climate justice which reflects their needs and perspectives; 2. to provide strategic support to women’s rights organizations working on climate justice to effectively communicate the work happening at local levels across regions in global media and policy.

Climate Impact: Tackling climate change and achieving climate justice requires the inputs and perspectives of all of us, particularly those most impacted, in developing real solutions. The work in amplifying women’s resilience efforts so far has highlighted over 70+ climate adaptation and mitigation projects in the last two years, and supported them in receiving additional fundingandinternational / national mediaattention. In addition, women are providing much needed education, training and capacity building on climate impacts in their networks and communities.

Gender Impact: The program tackles the underrepresentation of women in the climate change narrative. As reported by CNN, even though media coverage of climate change has increased significantly, only 15% of those interviewed on climate have been women. At COP21 in Paris for example, a focus on training and media skills ensured that women in this program were featured in over 100 articles, interviews and TV spots, including spots on Amy Goodman’s Democracy Now, and feature articles in environmental outlets such as Grist.

Scalability / replicability: This type of media training and support, particularly focused on women, can be mainstreamed and replicated across all types of climate change programming, ensuring all women-led & gender-just solutions are scaled and amplified at national and international levels. The ultimate vision in amplifying women’s voices is to transform the climate change narrative, from a technical issue to a moral, women’s rights, and human-centred issue that demands people-powered solutions.

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Gender responsive energy cooperatives: a social business model to implement renewable technologies within Georgia‘s climate strategy

Description of the project: WECF and local partners facilitate the development of energy cooperatives as successful and sustainable business models by providing workshops, mentoring and knowledge exchange with international experts. Energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are made accessible for a broad public, including women, through information events and citizen participation. These coops will support the gender sensitive NAMA (National Appropriate Mitigation Action) on sustainable rural energy in Georgia. Analysis of results show various co-benefits, e.g. reduced labor burden for women, increased awareness on renewable energy and energy efficiency, reduced costs for energy.

Climate Impact: Households in rural areas of Georgia spend approximately 30% of their income on energy: they depend on firewood for cooking, and heating. This results in heavy CO2 emissions and deforestation. This project reduces emissions by 1 ton CO2 /household. It also reduces Georgia’s dependence on imported fossil fuel. Rural territories become more climate resilient as there is less land degradation and deforestation. Energy cooperatives increase social cohesion and the share of renewable and affordable energy in the country’s energy market.

Gender Impact: WECF promotes gender equality by: 1. Empowering women and men equally in cooperative structures and projects that foster citizen participation and political involvement, 2. Reducing women’s unpaid labor burden, improving women’s health by reducing indoor air pollution and comfort by increasing availability of heat; 3. Ensuring that women and men participate equally in the energy cooperatives with at least 40% women in the management and supervisory boards.

Scalability / replicability: Energy cooperatives combine economic and technical know-how about energy technologies (e.g. solar collectors), ensuring efficiency and high quality services. The business models are self sustaining and can thus be replicated in other regions. The initiatives have been integrated in the Georgian Climate and Energy Policy for further upscaling. The promoted technologies have a pay back period of three years. The economic advantages and financial mechanisms (NAMA & a lease purchasing scheme via energy cooperatives) will create a high demand for solar and energy efficient technologies.

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Community Conservation Resilience Initiative: adaptable to different nations and contexts

Description of the project: The Community Conservation Resilience Initiative (CCRI) aims to assess the legal, political, moral, socio-economic, financial, technical and capacity-building support that is required to sustain and strengthen the resilience of community conservation and restoration initiatives in different communities around the world. The methodology is a simple guiding framework meant to be adapted to specific nation and local contexts. It includes a gender toolkit to identify and address potential forms of marginalization of women through dialogue within communities about women’s unique rights, roles, needs and aspirations.

Climate Impact: Many of the different communities at the study sites are going through severe weather changes; some have managed to successfully adapt – or are adapting- to such changes by using their traditional knowledge and practices. Women are key knowledge- holders, allowing entire communities to overcome the different challenges. For instance, in Samoa, strong self-organized women groups have established mangrove recovery programs by planting up to 2 acres of mangrove trees, which help the community face tidal waves, sea rising and ultimately help restore the rich biodiversity providing food, medicine, and income to the local populations.

Gender Impact: In many areas, patriarchal societies settled after colonization and the key role of women in community conservation is now invisible. For instance, in Ethiopia, women have lost most of their inheritance rights; but some traditions remain, bringing women’s key role back: ie. In Mount Bale women inherit from their mothers a ‘Singe’_ stick as a symbol of respect. This community observes strict non-violence rules for women. The CCRI intends to visualize the gender aspects of community conservation and is paving the pathways to empower women to take on leadership roles.

Scalability /replicability: The CCRI is conducted in 22 countries around the world. The results of this experiment will contribute to the implementation of the Convention on Biodiversity’s 2011–2020 Strategic Plan, and also to Aichi Targets and the proposed SDGs related to forests and climate change. It will provide policy advice on transformative, effective and appropriate forms of support for community conservation to foster climate change mitigation and resilience

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Assessing urban climate policies of cities from a gender perspective

Description of the project:  GenderCC’s “Gender Into Urban Climate Change Initiative” is conducted in collaboration with All India Women’s Conference (India), Aksi! for gender, social and ecological justice and Solidaritas Perempuan (Indonesia) and GenderCC Southern Africa. It explores options for integrating gender and social dimensions into the climate policies of several pilot cities. A key focus is developing a methodology which can be used to evaluate local climate policies and measures from a gender perspective. Interviews and scorecards are used to assess the local institutional setting and procedures, followed later by a more detailed gender scan and analysis of the city’s portfolio of specific policies and measures

Climate Impact: As urban settlements expand rapidly in many parts of the world, many cities face the challenge of becoming more resilient to climate impacts at the same time as tackling their rising emissions. Many cities are therefore currently developing and implementing strategies and policies to address climate change and its impacts. This project recognizes that existing and future climate policies can be made more effective and equitable by fully integrating gender dimensions into the planning and implementation process.

Gender Impact: Climate policies have the potential to bring benefits for all – from improved air quality and health as well as access to low carbon energy and transport services, to better livability of cities, enhanced resilience and job creation. Gender-blind policies, on the contrary, have been shown to exacerbate inequalities between women and men. Local governments can work closely with citizens and involve them in their efforts to address climate change. Both men and women have the right to be involved in decision-making and participate in shaping the future of their city.

Scalability /replicability: The importance for cities to develop and implement urban climate strategies and policies has been recognized recently. The project facilitates an international exchange of knowledge and experiences for integrating gender and social dimensions into climate policies of cities. The jointly developed and piloted methodology for Gender Assessment and Monitoring of Mitigation and Adaptation (GAMMA) is therefore replicable in any other city worldwide.

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