Gender and territorial governance for a fair climate response: cases from Morocco

Description of the project: Aware of climate change challenges and concerned about fair climate justice, ADFM works for an effective participation of women in the development and implementation of efficient policies to strengthen women environmental and socio-economic rights at national and territorial levels. ADFM accompanied 11 local municipalities for the creation of an “Equality, Equal Opportunities and Gender Approach” advisory body in four provinces (Ouarzazate, Zagora, Midelt and Tinghir). This project was conducted in collaboration with local civil society and elected deputies, as territorial authorities are responsible for local services and territorial development plans that can mitigate the impact of climate change on women.

Climate impact: Introducing a more environmentally friendly approach in territorial action plans in the water, agriculture, energy and waste sectors at local and regional levels contributes towards climate mitigation and adaptation. The involvement of women via this participative approach has enabled a stronger introduction of local knowledge into local sectoral programs reducing GHG emissions in energy consumption (ie. heating, insulation), and increasing climate adaptation capacities (ie. agriculture techniques).

Gender impact: ADFM promotes the gender approach in local and regional policies by: 1) building women’s capacity to participate in decision-making processes at local levels; 2) reducing women’s making women more resilient to climate change; 3) strengthening territorial resilience by bridging local decision-makers with women’s local knowledge in agriculture, home heating, water and waste; 4) disseminating a culture of gender equality and participatory approach.

Scalability / replicability: In Morocco, over 1500 municipalities belonging to 75 provinces and 12 regions will have to set-up an “Equity, equal opportunities and gender approach advisory body” in the next years, as enshrined in the new territorial Law 111-14, 112-14 and 113-14. ADFM’ first experiment in 11 municipalities can be extended to many other regions, based on results evaluation and follow-up activities.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Drinking from the clouds: women and men transform dew and fog into potable water

Description: The village Ait Baamrane, bordering the Sahara Desert, can no longer rely on well-water as it was depleted by overuse, poor management, and increasing droughts. This fog water harvesting project is based on technology inspired by ancestral knowledge on dew and fog collecting. It provides potable water to over 400 people. Reduced labour burden for women enables them to create income generating activities. DSH Water School also provides beneficiary villages with children’s learning programs on environment and STEM education – Science, Technology, Engineering.

Climate impact: By facilitating sustainable access to water in this arid region, an adaptation mechanism has been designed. Women in the communities have put in place a sustained environmental monitoring system. Harvesting dew and fog-water reduces the use of fossil fuels and the need for digging boreholes that depletes deep-aquifer water. Keeping their grazing animals and bees are vital for the maintenance of the cycle of Argan trees and the unique ecosystem of the region (Sahara and Atlantic intersection).

Gender Impact: Harvesting fog water in homes significantly reduces women and girls’ hard labour burden for water collection from distant sources. Girl’s time for school and education has improved. DSH has also started a female mentoring and leadership program to encourage girls to stay in school after adolescence. Women’s empowerment is realized through capacity building on environmental monitoring and knowledge transfer on engineering skills. Women have engaged in new income-generating activities.

Scalability /replicability: Ten years of applied research and feasibility studies by DSH confirm that harvesting fog can be expanded to other sites. Current beneficiaries are ambassadors for the concept in Morocco. Where the climate is suitable, DSH is supporting the building of other locally-led fog projects through transfer of knowledge, extensive open-source materials and outreach (manual in French & Arabic) for replication and scalability.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women and school children install and use solar cookers to preserve the Argan forest

Description of the project: The Union of Women Coopera- tives for Argan oil (UCFA) and the Foundation have been work- ing together since 2013 to install and disseminate solar cookers amongst populations of Southern Morocco, as a means of pre- venting deforestation of argan trees, reducing CO2 emissions and Avoiding toxic wood fire fumes. They raise awareness among pupils and their mothers about local climate issues and the advantages of using solar energy. Children and women are trained in the schools to assemble cookers (delivered in kits) and on their use. Finally the cookers are transferred to the families, where women adopt them with enthusiasm.

Climate Impact: Thanks to solar technology, CO2 emissions and toxic fumes caused by wood burning are significantly reduced. The simple and affordable technical solution makes solar energy accessible to women and local populations. The project contributes to the fight against deforestation and its climate consequences: 5 to 10 kg of wood are saved per day and per cooker.

Gender Impact: The project enables the reduction of unpaid wood collecting chores for women and young girls, which has a direct impact on their education, health and empowerment. The use of safe and clean solar technology, also has a positive impact on women’s health. UCFA and the Foundation strengthen the capacity of women through training of facilitators to dissemi-nate the cookers in the schools, and planned future creation
of a local small entreprise for the manufacture of cooker kits. At least 50% of the entreprise’s workforce will be women.

Scalability/replicability: The project methodology has been tested over the course of three pilot operations (120 cookers distributed) and evaluated in 2016. Local facilitators, women and men, have been trained to support schoolchildren and women  in the adoption phase. The solar cooker kits can be manufactured locally, involving women: the UCFA partners and Foundation,  are planning the creation of a local business in 2017-2018.

 

 

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags: