Rachel Harris speaks on behalf of the Women and Gender Consituency to the Subsidiary Body for Implementation

Rachel Harris of WEDO on behalf of the Women and Gender Constituency  at the closing session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation

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Rachel Harris speaks on behalf of the Women and Gender Consituency to the Subsidiary Body for Implementation

Rachel Harris of WEDO on behalf of the Women and Gender Constituency  at the closing session of the Subsidiary Body for Implementation

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COP21 Opening Plenary, Bridget Burns, December 2015

PARIS, France (Dec. 1, 2015)  – On Tuesday, Bridget Burns from Women’s Environmental & Development Organization, USA, held an intervention on behalf of the Constituency in the Joint COP/CMP Opening Plenary. Refering to the ‘act of defiance’ called for by some Heads of State on the previous day, she argued that “a true act of defiance would let us leave this COP committing to a genuinely transformative and binding agreement which challenges dirty economies, political and military systems, and fund renewable and just futures for all.“

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SB44 Opening, Prachi Rao, May 2016

BONN, Germany (May 16, 2016) – On Monday, Prachi Rao from the Women’s Environment & Development Organization (WEDO) on behalf of the Constituency, provided an intervention at the opening plenary of the 44th session of the Bonn Climate Change Conference. She called for real, just action, noting that “the terms [of the Paris Agreement] are still unclear, the ambition is too low, and the rights of people and the planet have not been secured.”

 

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Intervention on Warsaw Mechanism on Loss & Damage, Shaila Shadid, May 2016

BONN, Germany (May 24, 2016) – Shaila Shadid, of the Gender and Water Alliance in Bangladesh, spoke on the need to improve the capacities of vulnerable groups and to take a gender-sensitive approach in activities that address loss and damage in relation to disaster and climate change. Loss and damage cannot be measured only in terms of physical assets or GDP. Examples of non-economic losses include loss of life, cultural heritage or ecosystem services. Gender differences play double roles in the non-economic losses of climate. First, women often contribute to their families and their communities in non-monetary ways – often termed ‘care work’ (Genanet 2013). Therefore, an assessment of loss and damage that is based only on monetary or financial quantification may not take into account the value of women’s contribution to society. Second, it is possible that loss and damage affects women in developing countries more directly than men, for example, in terms of loss of life, or in relation to nutrition and migration.

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SBSTA 44 Closing, Shaila Shadid, May 2016

BONN, Germany (May 26, 2016) – Shaila Shadid, of the Gender and Water Alliance in Bangladesh, in a closing intervention for the SBSTA addressed that women’s capacity building, contributions, and leadership are central to finding a solution to achieve the principles of Paris Agreement. In order to bring about a paradigm shift towards climate resilient development pathways, globally and in individual countries, all climate change mitigation, loss & damage and adaptation actions need to also pursue broader environmental, social, economic, and development benefits in a gender-responsive way. A clear understanding of gender roles, norms and unequal power relations and how they can be addressed at all phases of water, agriculture and environmental management requires broader attention.

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ACE Workshop on Article 6 of the Convention (Doha Work Programme)

BONN, Germany (May 27, 2016) – Majandra Alejandra Rodriquez Acha, of WEDO, participated on behalf of the WGC in the ACE Workshop on Article 6 of the Convention (Doha Work Programme). Some of the issues the WGC highlighted included:

  • Ensure balance between all elements of Article 6 (we are leaving public participation and public access to information behind)
  • Civil society is already engaging in non-formal education, popular education, community education – how to connect in a way that makes this visible, that is respectful
  • Importance of gender mainstreaming in ensuring access to decision making, policy and education. Cannot adapt and mitigate climate change if 50% of population has obstacles to accessing participation and education
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SBSTA 45 Opening, Gertrude Kenyangi

Marrakech, Morocco (November, 7, 2016) – Gertrude Kenyangi, for the opening of the SBSTA, raised concerns about the Sustainable Development Mechanism mandated under the Paris Agreement, noting that previous market-based mechanisms developed under the UNFCCC have failed to reduce GHG emissions and have often caused human and women’s rights violations as well as other environmental harms. The WGC demanded a transformative approach that moves away from the offsetting logic to genuine actions that truly ensures GHG reduction while securing human rights, gender equality, the rights of indigenous peoples and environmental integrity.

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High Level Segment, Ipul Powaseu

Marrakech, Morocco (November, 17, 2016) – Ipul Powaseu of the Pacific Disability Network addressed the High Level Segment of the COP22, speaking on behalf of the WGC and sharing her own experiences. delivered the final intervention for the COP22, highlighting the key areas where Parties need to work on commitment and ambition. She shared, “I come from a small island in Papua New Guinea and the impacts of climate change are real for me. The shorelines are eroding almost 1 metre every year and for me, this is threatening my way of life, my livelihoods, and even posing greater challenges that as a woman with disability, I am also confronted with. Issues resulting from climate change impacts such as: decreasing food security resulting in malnutrition, decreasing access to clean water, sanitation, and hygiene, reduced access to infrastructure, shelter and basic services and increasing displacement are realities that I, as an indigenous woman with disability, from a small island in the pacific is faced with.”

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