Organik Farm: empowering women for a sustainable, climate resilient food production

Description of the project: Organik Farm (created in Dalat, Vietnam, in 2007) is a perfect example of women’s empowerment through sustainable, climate resilient farming and food distribution. Organik processes “bio” certified vegetables and fruits from mountainous lands. Vegetables are grown according to GAP (Good Agricultural Practices) and organic standards. The produce is distributed through their Ho-Chi-Minh City shop; online shop; diverse retail channels; also exporting to Cambodia and Thailand. The Farm employs women at all levels: farming, sales, accounting, purchasing and management. It offers a specific pricing policy for schools and hospitals, ensuring organic diet for children and the sick.

Climate impact: The Farm strengthens the ecosystems, ensuring presence of beneficial insects, greater below-ground diversity, nutrient cycling, disease suppression, nitrogen fixation. Its performance is good in energy consumption, soil conservation, water-use efficiency, water purity, increasing soil health (crop rotations, green manures, composting), proving that a farm can manage resources sustainably and climate friendly.

Gender impact: Vietnamese girls and women continue to suffer gender-based violence and gender inequalities. Organik Farm has 55 employees, of which 44 women: 8/17 farmers, 20/21 processing staff, 12/14 managers, and 2/3 shop assistants. Employees climb the work ladder very fast. Organik trains women on organic, GAP; hygiene food safety; free range; non-GMO; crop rotation; seedlings; natural pest control; animal husbandry. They also build capacity on decision-making for sales, purchases and coordination of market schedules.

Scalability / replicability: Organik Farm has already scaled up sales via an online platform. Its economic model aims to create new direct distribution channels and convince consumers to buy organic for a healthier diet and a sustainable impact on livelihoods of farmers and communities. The project has its own R&D center focused on the agronomic specificity of this mountainous area in North Vietnam. It promotes the local ethnic community’s knowledge and enables replication in similar areas.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Osukuru women surviving to climate impact through sustainable reforestation and low emitting stoves

Description of the project: Osukuru United Women’s Network provides community education on climate change, tree planting with seedlings and nursery beds, manufacture of Lorena cookstoves and biomass briquettes. It targets those most exposed to climate change in Uganda: training is primarily for women, but men are also included. Main objectives are to reduce CO2 emissions and indoor air pollution, improve women’s and children’s health, food security, and household income. The community (38,000 inhabitants) benefited from the increased food production as a result of reforestation. The initiative creates entrepreneurship opportunities and greater autonomy for women.

Climate impact: Since 2006, the village has experienced severe climate change impacts. The adaptation and mitigation activities of Osukuru United Women’s Network have produced immediate results: planted trees provide beneficial shade for food crops and combat soil erosion threatening food supply. The clean cookstoves have significantly reduced CO2 emissions and indoor air pollution caused by the burning of firewood.

Gender impact: The trainings have enabled the establishment of women’s small entreprises. 25 women are selling briquettes for the cookstoves; the extra income earned is used to start poultry business and pay their children’s school fees. Reforestation and agroforestry ensures increased food production and reinforce financial independence. Improved health, nutrition and revenues as well as counselling on sexual abuse are slowly improving women’s status and changing the community’s visions of gender roles.

Scalability / replicability: The scalability of the initiative lies in the strong commitment of the local community: after having lived through severe floods and droughts and being left out of international support, local donors and villagers contribute to the project from their own pockets, and they have seen the direct results of their investment in time and resources. Regular community decision-making meetings are chaired by both women and men.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women-led energy efficient agricultural model in the dry zones of Chicamocha Canon

Description of the project: MEEPZA is an agro-environnemental development initiative led by local women using local resources. Working on climate change adaptation, the project promotes efficient energy management within the households. The project’s main resource is the planting and production of Nopal (cactus) products. The Nopal plant is chosen because of its properties that make it an efficient carbon sink. The project beneficiaries are 30 rural women and their families (a total of 180 people). The project has generated many positive results in terms of food security, recovery of agricultural profitability, agro-environnemental development with gender equity, and highlighting the economic potential of arid zones.

Climate impact: This project is an adaptation measure responding to the impact of climate change in arid zones. The Nopal plant has high energy potential and adaptation capacity to extreme temperatures and depleted soils. The agro-ecological management of these crops means recovery of soils and the profitability of agricultural activities that use low input technology. Also, animals feed on Nopal plants, and the plants are fertilized with their manure, which is another sustainable use of local resources.

Gender impact: The initiative focuses on women’s equal rights, opportunities and empowerment through capacity-building and revenue generating activities. In this project, the empowered women also involved their families, thus resulting in a greater impact. MEEPZA ambitions that women see their actions not only as an income opportunity, but also as an engagement for climate resilience, food security, and gender equality. This is strengthened by encouraging their participation in decision-making spaces within their communities.

Scalability / replicability: MEEPZA is a decentralized project that can be replicated in any arid region with limited access to water. The applied techniques are low-cost and sustainable, therefore, could encompass a complete production chain that starts from an agro-ecological use of local resources. To ensure gender-responsive replication of the project, women are trained to provide technical assistance with a gender lense to those new initiatives.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Integrated waste management system to promote food and energy security among Mayan indigenous women

Description of the project: The project benefits 2,454 women (and their families) of the indigenous Mayan communities in Yucatan, Mexico. Energy security, food sovereignty and agricultural sustainability are achieved through an naerobic digester, treating animal waste, that produces biogas and biofertilizer. Women get training on the use, management and maintenance of the biodigester. The digester reduces soil and water contamination, airborne pathogens causing diseases, and provides energy security. The biofertilizer, combining the functions of fertilizer, pesticide and soil regenerator, aids food sovereignty. The project promotes women’s capacities for inclusion in decision-making at all levels.

Climate impact: Project achieves over 99% pathogen reduction. Biogas displaces liquid petroleum gas and woodfuel. Organic fertilizer displaces synthetic fertilizers, eliminating environmental impact (775 MT CO2/year). The system, designed with local materials, requires low maintenance. No need for external technical assistance, repairs, fossil fuels, fertilizers; pesticides are eliminated. Children and youths learn to promote sustainability while adults are trained in forest management.

Gender impact: Women are healthier and are able to take up more income generating activities, such as embroidery. They have extra time for family and for themselves, or participating in community activities. Other impacts include: reduction of burden of cleaning pig waste; significant health impacts from substitution of woodfuel and plastic; more spare time (previously used to collect wood); more varied, nutritious and organic diet with own produce; women are able to participate in decisionmaking processes.

Scalability / replicability: The project is easy to replicate and upscale. Trained users handle and teach others how to install, manage and repair the system. It uses easily available material. The educational component includes a children’s tale to make the technology more understandable and easily transmitted. The project works closely with community members; the technology is specially designed for harsh rural conditions. The smallscale biodigester is a high quality durable good, easy to package, distribute and install.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Africa kitchen revolution: training women on transferable mud-building techniques

WINNER

Description of the project: BWC offers a simple, low cost, sustainable alternative to heavy use of solid fuel by building clean cookstoves with mud-building techniques and local materials. The main objectives of this participatory project are to: improve the livelihood of women by training them on the construction of low-emitting mud cookstoves, reduce air pollution, improve health, and enhance women’s participation in community engagement. Reaching 300 beneficiaries in 30 communities, BWC has held 10 participatory stove building workshops with women’s groups; held training of trainers; supported the establishment of partnerships and cooperatives fostering income generation; organised annual meetings for all trainees.

Climate impact: In rural Cameroon, 98% of the population are using large amounts of firewood and charcoal for cooking. This is causing deforestation, CO2 emissions, heavy indoor air pollution and affecting the health of the women cooking. Following the Paris Agreement, this project builds on a bottom-up approach to fight climate change. With the improved cookstoves, BWC expects firewood consumption in the communities to be reduced by 60-70%, resulting in less pressure on forests and reduced health impacts.

Gender impact: Women are gaining technical skills (building and repairing cookstoves) originally carried out by men in the communities. The adopted skills are easily transferable and over 12 women beneficiaries have engaged in the construction of mud buildings. With less time spent on collecting firewood and cooking, women have more time for other activities. 20 women have formed a trainer’s network, empowering more women to engage in local advocacy and income generating activities.

Scalability / replicability: The mud-building technique is easy to replicate, adapt and upscale as it uses simple technology with available local, natural, ecological and low cost materials. This project also relies on a Global Ecovillage Network and an online Solutions Library with one-page introductions and overviews of technical alternatives. Developing and implementing sustainable long-lasting projects in local ownership is one of the foundations of climate change adaptation and mitigation, which requires a truly participatory approach.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags: