Amplifying voice and influence: women transform the climate narrative

Description of the project: This project, as part of WEDO’s broader work on mobilizing women for climate justice, provides mentorship and media training for women from frontline communities including indigenous, rural, and grassroots leaders across 8 regions. Goals are: 1. to build the capacity of individual women environmental defenders to pitch and share their local stories of resilience and innovation, thus crafting a narrative of climate justice which reflects their needs and perspectives; 2. to provide strategic support to women’s rights organizations working on climate justice to effectively communicate the work happening at local levels across regions in global media and policy.

Climate Impact: Tackling climate change and achieving climate justice requires the inputs and perspectives of all of us, particularly those most impacted, in developing real solutions. The work in amplifying women’s resilience efforts so far has highlighted over 70+ climate adaptation and mitigation projects in the last two years, and supported them in receiving additional fundingandinternational / national mediaattention. In addition, women are providing much needed education, training and capacity building on climate impacts in their networks and communities.

Gender Impact: The program tackles the underrepresentation of women in the climate change narrative. As reported by CNN, even though media coverage of climate change has increased significantly, only 15% of those interviewed on climate have been women. At COP21 in Paris for example, a focus on training and media skills ensured that women in this program were featured in over 100 articles, interviews and TV spots, including spots on Amy Goodman’s Democracy Now, and feature articles in environmental outlets such as Grist.

Scalability / replicability: This type of media training and support, particularly focused on women, can be mainstreamed and replicated across all types of climate change programming, ensuring all women-led & gender-just solutions are scaled and amplified at national and international levels. The ultimate vision in amplifying women’s voices is to transform the climate change narrative, from a technical issue to a moral, women’s rights, and human-centred issue that demands people-powered solutions.

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Gender responsive energy cooperatives: a social business model to implement renewable technologies within Georgia‘s climate strategy

Description of the project: WECF and local partners facilitate the development of energy cooperatives as successful and sustainable business models by providing workshops, mentoring and knowledge exchange with international experts. Energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies are made accessible for a broad public, including women, through information events and citizen participation. These coops will support the gender sensitive NAMA (National Appropriate Mitigation Action) on sustainable rural energy in Georgia. Analysis of results show various co-benefits, e.g. reduced labor burden for women, increased awareness on renewable energy and energy efficiency, reduced costs for energy.

Climate Impact: Households in rural areas of Georgia spend approximately 30% of their income on energy: they depend on firewood for cooking, and heating. This results in heavy CO2 emissions and deforestation. This project reduces emissions by 1 ton CO2 /household. It also reduces Georgia’s dependence on imported fossil fuel. Rural territories become more climate resilient as there is less land degradation and deforestation. Energy cooperatives increase social cohesion and the share of renewable and affordable energy in the country’s energy market.

Gender Impact: WECF promotes gender equality by: 1. Empowering women and men equally in cooperative structures and projects that foster citizen participation and political involvement, 2. Reducing women’s unpaid labor burden, improving women’s health by reducing indoor air pollution and comfort by increasing availability of heat; 3. Ensuring that women and men participate equally in the energy cooperatives with at least 40% women in the management and supervisory boards.

Scalability / replicability: Energy cooperatives combine economic and technical know-how about energy technologies (e.g. solar collectors), ensuring efficiency and high quality services. The business models are self sustaining and can thus be replicated in other regions. The initiatives have been integrated in the Georgian Climate and Energy Policy for further upscaling. The promoted technologies have a pay back period of three years. The economic advantages and financial mechanisms (NAMA & a lease purchasing scheme via energy cooperatives) will create a high demand for solar and energy efficient technologies.

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Climate Justice – Feminist Participatory Action Research (CJ-FPAR)

Description of the project: APWLD believes that empowering women’s local movements is essential to achieving gender equality and shaping effective, just responses to climate change. APWLD supports grassroots organisations to conduct evidencebased community research on the impacts of climate change, design solutions and advocate for relevant policy and resource changes. APWLD uses a Feminist Participatory Action Research (FPAR) framework to develop the capacity or rural, indigenous, migrant and urban poor women, so they are able to collectively understand, document the impacts of climate change and develop community solutions in response.

Climate Impact: Women play a critical role in coping with the impacts of climate change, yet they are too often excluded from decision-making processes at all levels. The programme aims to improve climate actions by providing women with knowledge and experience so they can participate in policy dialogue, and advocate for their own needs and solutions to be included into climate policies at the local, national and international levels. In 2017, the Climate Justice FPAR programme will focus on climate displacement.

Gender Impact: The Climate Justice FPAR empowers grassroots women particularly through improving their political leadership skills which allows them to address their own issues in relevant decision-making processes. The FPAR gives voice to women as the experts of their own lives and enables them to shape policy decisions. The FPAR process strategically identifies the researchers and experts of their community issues and promotes them into policy dialogue.

Scalability / replicability: APWLD is documenting the processes of its FPAR programme in training which will be shared with its member and partner organisations interested in undertaking similar community-led research. FPAR is versatile as methodology and can be adapted for documenting other community issues apart from climate change. For instance, APWLD has used FPAR for implementing community-led research and advocacy on issues of violence against women and land and labour rights in the past.

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Women as drivers of change for sustainable food consumption and production

Description of the project: Started in 2012, this project aims to empower women and local communities to address food security problems under climate change. This is achieved in four ways: 1) mobilizing women to adopt a low-carbon food consumption lifestyle through workshops; 2) supporting women to launch climate change campaigns in their communities; 3) providing a free online map to promote local food sourcing from “green spots”; 4) drawing the government’s attention on food education in communities and schools.

Climate Impact: In the past decade, the number and the intensity of typhoons have escalated, threatening Taiwan’s food supply. Homemakers United Foundation has convinced 580 small farmers to use NON-GMO seeds and sustainable farming practices. Between 2012 and 2016, 100 food education programs have been held in Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung, with 4,000+ moms and members of the local communities participating. In 2015 a “Green Food Community Online Map”, was launched, mobilizing youth on an “anti-climate change” action on a daily basis.

Gender Impact: In Taiwan, women are aware of climate change and are drivers of change. Homemakers United Foundation enables 700+ women to launch and lead various food education programs in primary schools, universities, and their communities. Women are empowered to trigger behavioral change towards sustainable food consumption and production (reducing food waste, eating locally and seasonally, sourcing locally to urban farming etc.)

Scalability / replicability: The educational programs use simple and easy tools such as picture books, cooking recipe, online maps, which are easy to replicate in communities. The HUF also published open-source handbooks, to foster expansion in more primary schools, universities or communities. 3 food education exchange platforms have been created to promote low carbon food consumption

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Low-carbon gender responsive manufacturing of all-natural Caribbean beauty treats

Description of the project: The project pursues two goals: 1. To increase by 20% the number of manufacturing companies utilizing sustainable, climate friendly techniques, promoting best practices for low-carbon manufacturing in the Caribbean region. 2. To enhance the income, health, education level and entrepreneurial skills of women in the Caribbean by 25% by 2020. With the creation of 250 healthy cosmetic products, this social enterprise improves the lives of more than 2 million people, and serves approximately 1.5 million customers in Trinidad and Tobago and the wider Caribbean, 90% being women.

Climate Impact: The manufacturing process uses agricultural nutrient-rich waste discarded by farmers: mango seeds, avocado seeds, fruit and vegetable matter inadequate for consumption but with great nutrition benefits. It uses low resource input, low-carbon approach, to create healthy and affordable personal care products for all age-groups and backgrounds. The project reduces GHG by reforesting the area using permaculture techniques, with indigenous plants and trees.

Gender Impact: The social enterprise employs rural women from disadvantaged backgrounds. 70% of the enterprise’s benefits are used to improve the livelihood of women in the Caribbean region. It supports education, living conditions and health of over 1.8 million women. 20% of the projects investments goes directly towards mentoring girls and young women.

Scalability / replicability: The development of an efficient low-carbon manufacturing process allows for an upscaled production via low-demand scheduling and strategies which are designed and implemented by women to ensure greater accessibility and reduced manual labor input. A just payment strcuture has been implemented with gender-based incentives. The social enterprise works with women-led organizations such as the Network of Rural Women Producers and others in the Caribbean working towards sustainability.

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Ethnic Minority Women’s Empowerment

Description of the project: This project aims at empowering remote ethnic minority women to actively participate in local socio-economic development planning and decision-making. To achieve this objective, the project focuses on four components: 1) women’s voice in local development plan; 2) climate resilient livelihood; 3) strengthening women’s groups; 4) fighting gender-based violence. The project targets 4,500 women and 3,000 men of Thai, Tay, Dzao and Hmong people in remote northern mountain area. Nearly 90% of women were aware of climate change and its implication on their community and 43% of target women increased their income.

Climate Impact: The project has worked with indigenous communities to conduct climate vulnerability and capacity assessments, as well as research on climate resilient livelihood models. For the first time in their life local people reflected on climate change and its impact. A system of sustainable rice intensification (SRI) was applied. People saved 40% of their seedlings, reduced fertilizers use up to 40%, and 30% water. CO2 emissions from SRI practice can fall by 70%. This model helps farmers adapt better to drought and disaster by reducing water usage and shortening the cultivation period.

Gender Impact: The project established a social protection net for local women via a saving and loan association. This is a platform for women to talk, share, start saving and gain easy access to loans. It improves women’s confidence and solidarity. The SRI technical trainings were introduced for men and women. The latter could for the first time build their capacity on technical knowledge and agriculture, usually male dominated. As a result, women improved their income by $70 per acre of rice.

Scalability / replicability: CARE collaborates with Women’s Union – a national organization present in every village of Vietnam. This ensures for replicability across the country. Only minimal investment is needed for SRI. CARE provides technical assistance to partners. Women’s Union has already replicated this model in other sites: a Dzao village has also replicated SRI model without any support

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Light Up Skatang Tribe With Renewable Energy

Description of the project: “Light Up Skatang Tribe With Renewable Energy” was initiated by Skatang youth who collaborated with Tainan Community College. Skatang is a remote indigenous tribe where women makeup2/3of itspopulation. This project utilizes solar energy to improve the living conditions in the Skatang tribe while protecting their sustainable living traditions. It promotes women’s access to renewable energy by training them on the installation, maintenance and use solar PV systems. The project foresees the creation of a 100% solar-powered tribe center in the community. It will raise awareness of the broad public on energy justice in Taiwan.

Climate Impact: Diesel generators are the main source of energy in the Skatang tribe. Each household consumes about 0.4 liters of diesel for lighting every day, which equals to 1.05 kilograms of carbon emission per household per day. After the installation of solar PV systems, the carbon reduction is about 5,7 t CO2 per year. Thus the solar PV system has a climate mitigation impact and improves the Skatang tribe’s resilience to climate change.

Gender Impact: The project reduces women’s domestic labor burden: tribal women noted that the Solar PV System effectively saves their time and energy, which can be used for other income generating or educational activities. Further, the technical trainings on the use of solar PV systems allow women to build their own capacities in renewable energy technology.

Scalability / replicability: The three steps methodology of this project makes it easily replicable: needs assessment, installation of solar PV systems and women’s capacity building program. The cooperation of Skatang youth with Tainan Community University, enhances the goal to upscale the project to a 100% renewable energy powered community center and a self-sufficient indigenous tribe.

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Strengthening women’s ancestral and artisanal fishery to preserve mangrove natural resources in the Saloum delta

WINNER

Description of the project: Faced with rising water levels, soil salinization and industrial overfishing, women fishers from 7 villages of the Saloum River Delta restore and develop sustainable fishing and processing practices of mangrove shellfish. The catch is calibrated and weighted, biological recovery and reseeding is implemented and improved stoves and solar dryers are used for shellfish processing. Women participate in the regulation meetings of local artisanal fishing areas. They defend their rights and their ancestral knowledge to ensure their economic autonomy and preserve the endangered ecosystem on which the local population depends.

Climate Impact: The Saloum Delta and its fishing resources are threatened by rising water levels and heavy migration to the coastal areas. To prevent overfishing and deforestation, the women practice a balanced system based on knowledge transfer, consultation with elected officials to protect the resources, and the reforestation of the mangrove. These practices have improved the resilience of a precious ecosystem classified as a UNESCO Heritage site, and reduced CO2 emissions caused by wood burning.

Gender Impact: 4,800 women fishers have been trained to defend their rights to resources in the regulated fishing areas, to reduce the costs and the hardship of the processing tasks, and to improve marketing. A gender study of the fishery’s economic and gender relationships was conducted: daily time allocation, comparison of contributions to domestic and productive tasks. The objective is to strengthen economic solidarity and care within households.

Scalability / replicability: Proven methods of sustainable resource management, exchange of expertise within a structured network with the support of ENDA: the REFEPAS-network of women for artisanal fishing in Senegal. Replicable training modules on gender inequalities, capacity building for leadership, management and marketing. ENDA collaborates with the IUPAUniversity Institute for Artisanal Fishing, the IRD, the Direction of natural parks, regional and local authorities.

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Community Conservation Resilience Initiative: adaptable to different nations and contexts

Description of the project: The Community Conservation Resilience Initiative (CCRI) aims to assess the legal, political, moral, socio-economic, financial, technical and capacity-building support that is required to sustain and strengthen the resilience of community conservation and restoration initiatives in different communities around the world. The methodology is a simple guiding framework meant to be adapted to specific nation and local contexts. It includes a gender toolkit to identify and address potential forms of marginalization of women through dialogue within communities about women’s unique rights, roles, needs and aspirations.

Climate Impact: Many of the different communities at the study sites are going through severe weather changes; some have managed to successfully adapt – or are adapting- to such changes by using their traditional knowledge and practices. Women are key knowledge- holders, allowing entire communities to overcome the different challenges. For instance, in Samoa, strong self-organized women groups have established mangrove recovery programs by planting up to 2 acres of mangrove trees, which help the community face tidal waves, sea rising and ultimately help restore the rich biodiversity providing food, medicine, and income to the local populations.

Gender Impact: In many areas, patriarchal societies settled after colonization and the key role of women in community conservation is now invisible. For instance, in Ethiopia, women have lost most of their inheritance rights; but some traditions remain, bringing women’s key role back: ie. In Mount Bale women inherit from their mothers a ‘Singe’_ stick as a symbol of respect. This community observes strict non-violence rules for women. The CCRI intends to visualize the gender aspects of community conservation and is paving the pathways to empower women to take on leadership roles.

Scalability /replicability: The CCRI is conducted in 22 countries around the world. The results of this experiment will contribute to the implementation of the Convention on Biodiversity’s 2011–2020 Strategic Plan, and also to Aichi Targets and the proposed SDGs related to forests and climate change. It will provide policy advice on transformative, effective and appropriate forms of support for community conservation to foster climate change mitigation and resilience

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Assessing urban climate policies of cities from a gender perspective

Description of the project:  GenderCC’s “Gender Into Urban Climate Change Initiative” is conducted in collaboration with All India Women’s Conference (India), Aksi! for gender, social and ecological justice and Solidaritas Perempuan (Indonesia) and GenderCC Southern Africa. It explores options for integrating gender and social dimensions into the climate policies of several pilot cities. A key focus is developing a methodology which can be used to evaluate local climate policies and measures from a gender perspective. Interviews and scorecards are used to assess the local institutional setting and procedures, followed later by a more detailed gender scan and analysis of the city’s portfolio of specific policies and measures

Climate Impact: As urban settlements expand rapidly in many parts of the world, many cities face the challenge of becoming more resilient to climate impacts at the same time as tackling their rising emissions. Many cities are therefore currently developing and implementing strategies and policies to address climate change and its impacts. This project recognizes that existing and future climate policies can be made more effective and equitable by fully integrating gender dimensions into the planning and implementation process.

Gender Impact: Climate policies have the potential to bring benefits for all – from improved air quality and health as well as access to low carbon energy and transport services, to better livability of cities, enhanced resilience and job creation. Gender-blind policies, on the contrary, have been shown to exacerbate inequalities between women and men. Local governments can work closely with citizens and involve them in their efforts to address climate change. Both men and women have the right to be involved in decision-making and participate in shaping the future of their city.

Scalability /replicability: The importance for cities to develop and implement urban climate strategies and policies has been recognized recently. The project facilitates an international exchange of knowledge and experiences for integrating gender and social dimensions into climate policies of cities. The jointly developed and piloted methodology for Gender Assessment and Monitoring of Mitigation and Adaptation (GAMMA) is therefore replicable in any other city worldwide.

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Population, Health and Environment (PHE) approach in climate change policies: the Philippines‘ experience

Description of the project: PATH Foundation Philippines, Inc. (PFPI) implemented the Population, Health and Environment and Climate Change Project in the Philipppines‘ Verde Island Passage. Verde Island is a key marine biodiversity area threatened by overfishing, pollution and climate change. The goal of the project is to mainstream sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) into climate change policy and practice. The project applied a developmental approach (PHE) that forges multisectoral collaboration and partnership, employs multiple interventions to address SRHR needs (family planning), biodiversity loss, poor health and food insecurity to foster climate resilient communities.

Climate Impact: Women play a critical role in achieving climate change resilience. PFPI’s scoping study results show that women are central to conceiving and implementing solutions. Planning their families, managing the resources and being pro-health and pro-environment advocates in their own communities will help to build resilience to climate change. All of which will contribute to a better future for their children. The women also highlighted that collaboration and agrrements between communities will create synergy in community actions and results.

Gender Impact: At the core of the population, health , environment and climate change nexus is the ”burden on the woman“. Fishing communities in the Verde Islands experience declining fish catch, depleting potable water and poor health. Lack of livelihood options, loss of family income and food insecurity drive women to engage in multiple jobs and to work longer hours to supplement the family’s income. The project adresses women’s needs and rights as well as family planning in a participatory approach, helping them in identifying coping strategies.

Scalability /replicability: Since 2000, PFPI designed and implemented community based programs applying PHE as a development approach to address the inter-relationships betwenn population, health and environment dynamics. The goal is to improve eco-human well being. Policy and decisionmakers in the project affirm the need to mainstream PHE approach in policies and programs to achieve climate resilient territories. PHE approach can be replicated and scaled-up via best practice sharing and lessons learned.

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Collective bio-building: a gender sensitive popular education

Description of the project: This project is an original experience of popular education, a conscious political-educational trend in Latin America. Since 2012 students and families are collaborating on a community bioconstructed school, using local ecological materials. BioEscuela Popular offers regular courses for children and adults on traditional knowledge and culture, skill sharing, environmental, climate awareness raising.

In 2015, BioEscuela El Cantaro adopted a gender approach, by creating a special training program for low-income women, on how to process clay for construction and artisanal products.

Climate Impact: Sustainable, low-energy housing is key for fighting climate change. The Biobuilding workshops raise awareness among participants on climate challenges and our ecological footprint. Biobuildings use natural and locally sourced materials, which do not need high-energy processing, do not generate synthetic waste, and generally have high insulation qualities. (hay, clay). BioEscuela restores traditional and ancestral natural building techniques.

Gender Impact: A specific program has been developed with UN-Women to empower low-income women by building their capacities in the use of clay for construction and artisanal products. The objective is to provide them with technical skills that will enable them to find new jobs or create revenue-generating activities. BioEscuela El Cantaro provides classes for over 800 children and girls every year. Their sense of collective citizenship and solidarity is being strengthened to build a more gender sensitive and sustainable society.

Scalability /replicability: The BioEscuela Popular experiment has a nationwide outreach in Paraguay, many young people, women and children participate annually in the free trainings. The methodologies and good practices shared in the school are disseminated as open-source learning material through website and media. The concept is replicable in any country. The project sustains the community of Aregua by providing guidance on sustainable community projects and social and environmental village solutions.

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Building women’s capacities on seed conservation and agro-ecology to adapt to climate change

Description of the project: The project Seeds of Hope aims to improve resilience to climate change, food sovereignty, and the economic autonomy of women and farming communities in Northern India. It builds on preserving the biodiversity of the area and trains in priority women on agro-ecological techniques, seeds conservation and reproduction as well as food processing. Direct beneficiaries are 686 farmers, of which 95% are women. The French association SOL cooperates with Navdanya, an Indian association founded by Vandana Shiva.

Climate Impact: The project strengthens the climatic resilience of the region: agro-ecology strengthens the fertility and moisture of soils (organic matter content increases by 25% according to qualitative analysis), the conservation and reproduction of seeds allows for the rehabilitation of biodiversity, a climate mitigating factor. Yields have been improved by 20% and dependence on the purchase of seeds lowered by 50%; the quality and quantity of the food supply improved significantly. Uttarakhand aims to become a 100% organic State by 2020.

Gender Impact: In rural India, women play an essential role in subsistence farming and family nutrition. The training courses in which they participate strenghten their autonomy and their local democratic and political stature. The project fosters the generation of independent income for women, which improves their families’ living conditions and women’s human rights.

Scalability /replicability: The sustainability of the project is ensured by a 10-year partnership between French and Indian associations. Their goal is to extend the project to 15 new villages during the 2015- 2018 period, in order to use this model for similar climatic and agricultural areas, and to influence the Indian Government in the long-term for the promotion of organic agriculture.

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Women cooperative preserving the Kinyara forest through bee farming and sustainable agriculture

Description of the project: The Budongo women bee cooperative generates income for 200 rural women affected by HIV living in the sugarcane area of Kinyara. The project develops organic honey production and sustainable agriculture as an alternative to sugarcane monoculture that deplete forests. Since 2012 the cooperative has produced over 1 ton of honey, trained more than 100 women and men in sustainable agriculture and modern bee farming practices, saved more than 15,000 ha of forest from monoculture encroachment, created jobs for over 50 women locally and in district authorities. The project is conducted in cooperation with the National Forest Authority.

Climate Impact: The project’s sustainable land and forest management has preserved 15000 ha of forest from depletion, and improved carbon sequestration through the plantation of 5000 indigenous trees. Additionally,the cooperative has developped energy saving cookstoves (2000 pieces locally contructed) which significantly reduces CO2 emissions. Enabling improved food production among the farmers provides a sustainable alternative to the dominant sugarcane monocultures in the Kinyara forest.

Gender Impact: Safeplan Uganda and Budongo cooperative have empowered over 400 women affected by HIV in 4 sub-districts, sharing skills on energy saving and sustainable agriculture. 80 women have received training on sustainable bee-farming and started sustainable honey production generating revenues of up to $400 yearly. Women, men and youths have worked together to support rural women’s empowerment through participatory approach.

Scalability /replicability: The project is scalable to other areas because the Bee Enterprise supports its members with inputs at a lower cost than the operational and production costs. The lead agency Safeplan Uganda assists women and communitiy leaders in re-organizing groups into self-management structures. All project partners also provide technical support with equipment and capacity building for staff or group leaders.

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Women agricultural cooperatives ensuring sustainable livelihoods in climate and armed conflict impacted territories

Description of the project: By promoting collective, sustainable models of agriculture, the project supports the climate-resilient livelihood of food insecure women who have been dependent on humanitarian aid. The project has been successful in improving the climate and overall resilience of over 18,900 individuals in 26 communities in Palestine. This has been achieved by enabling 35 CBOs, out of which 24 are women’s rural cooperatives, to better respond to their communities’ food and water needs while facing climate change under territorial occupation.

Climate Impact: Due to climate change and armed conflict, small-scale farmers in Palestine are in a vulnerable position in terms of resilience and subsistence. UAWC’s implements sustainable, climate resilient agriculture: the seed bank assists cooperatives in selecting drought resistant crops; they also implement water management and compost systems, green roofs, trainings on organic food production. By supporting CBOs to re-cultivate this land UAWC helps them adapt to climate change and protect their settlements.

Gender Impact: Women’s participation in the Palestinian labor force is 17%, the lowest in the Arab world. This project has drastically improved women’s influence in Palestine’s local economy and policymaking. With their food products, women have found an avenue for participating and voicing their opinions in their households, and also in the economic and public sphere. Empowerment is ensured by regular trainings and skill sharing. 24 of the 35 CBOs involved in the project are women’s CBOs.

Scalability /replicability: The project builds the capacity of local communities so they can maintain their operations beyond the duration of the project’s lifetime. This has been achieved through UAWC’s local partnerships and by putting the priorities of the CBOs at the centre of the project. CBOs have been supported in establishing field schools and demonstration plots to spread good practices and provide on-site training. The project could be replicated with expectedly positive results.

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Agro-ecological women cooperatives ensure food sovereignty in drought threatened areas

Description of the project: Facing increasing droughts and water scarcity, inland areas in Senegal need to preserve food sovereignty through climate resilient and sustainable agriculture. The Afrika Mandela Ranch is an ecological farm school which also hosts an elementary school. Through a cooperative of women from surrounding villages (Mbondy, Kalassan, Keer Saer), it implements agroecology and income generating food production for women. Focusing on local natural resources and preserving the ambient eco-system, the project fights erosion by planting trees and increasing soil fertility.

Climate Impact: The women agricultural cooperative supported by Mandela Ranch rebuilds the socio-environmental ecosystem with fruit plantations and agroforestry (planting trees around vegetable crops). The trees absorb CO2, reduce soil erosion and ecosystem degradation by regenerating and fertilizing unproductive soils. The crop diversification helps mitigating and adapting to climate change. This projects enables more sustainable returns with increased revenues for women and enhances sustainable development at local level.

Gender Impact: The creation of a women’s cooperative has led to sustainable economic development for women and the community. Women have been trained on agro-ecological skills and product transformation: processing of fruit, vegetables and plants with small production lines. The project includes literacy courses on income generating activities, thus fostering women’s economic autonomy and emancipation Through the positive results – well-being and better child nutrition – social cohesion in the community has improved.

Scalability /replicability: The Afrika Mandela Ranch runs an elementary school for children of the neighbouring villages, ensuring that pupils integrate and replicate climate-resilient behaviour in their daily life. This sustainable ranch model, combining children’s education, capacity building for women and ecological, healthy local food production, can be replicated in many countries.

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Empowering women’s groups in disaster prone areas through community based sustainable water management

Description of the project: The Gemawang, Kaloran & Temmangung districts in Central Java are threatened by water scarcity and landslides due to deforestation. This project empowers women’s groups to identify and implement adaptation strategies within their communities. The women conduct field assessment and feasibility studies with village authorities and water experts and select appropriate water management technologies to adapt to a changing environment. They use water saving solutions, water infiltration techniques and ecological sanitation, thus improving livelihoods in their communities.

Climate Impact: Massive deforestation in the Central Java area has significantly reduced groundwater supply and led to a severe drought. The changing function of the forest has also caused serious damage to the land and increased the risk of landslide. The women’s groups and people in the sub-villages have worked together to develop sustainable water management systems, preserve important old trees and re-plant young trees around the water sources to prevent landslide, as well as maintaining water supply through infiltration and preserving a balanced ecosystem. These measures are effective climate adaptation strategies.

Gender Impact: The project was initiated by women. The women’s groups are actively involved in decisions on water management technology and they do advocacy both at local and regional level. 10 members of the women’s group Muncar Lor’s were involved in the regional authority’s field assessment on water. Gender equality is also strengthened by income generating activities through the sale of water technology. This new income can be used for maintaining facilities, setting up social funds, and ensuring self-development.

Scalability /replicability: Replicability is ensured by the use of Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) in identifying capacity and vulnerability of the community. Scalability can be reached by an organized structure within the women’s groups, with three members acting as main coordinators (head, secretary, and treasurer). Capacity building is conducted via trainings.

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Women building and using clean cook stoves and planting a Great Green Wall on over 1500 km

Description of the project: 

Nigeria’s Great Green Wall Project aims to address the negative social, economic and environmental impacts of land degradation and desertification in Northern Nigeria. Over 110 women in 11 states (Adamawa, Sokoto, Katsina, Gombe, Kano, Borno, Yobe, Kebbi, Bauchi, Jigawa and Zamfara) have been trained on constructing 1500 energy efficient cook stoves from local materials to reduce the burning of biomass and the degradation of vegetation. Women’s capacities are also built on creating alternative sources of income, so as to raise their economic autonomy.

Climate Impact: The use of energy efficient cook stoves reduces fuel wood consumption – and CO2 emissions – of households by 80%, thus significantly reducing deforestation. This project additionally foresees the replantation by the governement of different species of trees on a territory – the “Great Green Wall“ – that will be about 1,500 km long (East-West) and 2 km wide (North-South), in the 11 states faced with the highest desertification rate in Nigeria.

Gender Impact: Women are crucial for adopting green technologies for their household and spreading good practices within their communities. This initiative empowered them with important new technical skills, and new leadership roles in their villages, as they actively contribute to mitigating climate change and fighting desertification. The project significantly reduces women’s unpaid labor burden, creating opportunities for revenue generating activities. Finally, it improves their health by reducing indoor air pollution.

Scalability /replicability: WEP has developped a technical training module that can be easily replicated. Using local materials also ensures an affordable upscaling of the program. WEO intends to extended this concept in the coming years to the Middle Belt and South Nigeria, where climate change is severely impacting the livelihood of people, especially women, who often risk their lives when going long distances to get fuel wood. The program could be expanded to many other similar regions in Africa and to other continents.

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Economic empowerment of rural women with solar energy and micro-enterpreneurship

Description of the project: This green energy project aims to demonstrate the economic sustainability and gender impact of selling solar dried fruits, vegetables, and condiments. The micro-enterprise, created and managed by 5 women, uses 2 solar dryers (capacity of 50 kg each) to process and transform local seasonal fruits and vegetables into packaged food products with strong value added. They work with 43 women suppliers, who receive important additional revenues and reduce product wasting. The organization trains women’s groups in solar drying processes and marketing skills.

Climate Impact: Using solar dryers reduces the dependence on fossil fuel and saves 1.2 t. firewood /year. 3,6 t. raw fruits, vegetables and spices are dehydrated annually to produce fruit bars, pepper, arrow root powder, tamarind, chips and wafers. Reducing the rotting of raw fruits (about 3 t. jackfruit, guava, mango) also minimizes CH4 emissions. About 5-6 t. of compost used for kitchen gardens, sequestering 1 t. CO2. Climate change awareness and knowledge has been increased among households and women’s groups.

Gender Impact: Women are empowered through local production and selling of high value-add food products. Revenue increase for women employees and suppliers (from10$ to 30$ /month depending on the season and product). Reduced labour burden (2 hrs/day), creating time for other income generating activities. Participation in purchasing and processing decisions, marketing, and profits sharing. The micro-enterprise participates in fairs and festivals to share knowledge, offer training support.

Scalability /replicability: Started with 1 solar dryer in 2005. Has since expanded to a micro-enterprise in 2009 with one more dryer, more equipment and technical training. Today more than 400 women have been trained in solar drying process and entrepreneurship skills. The micro-entreprise format can be replicated, as well as the distribution structure: retail outlets, schools, local markets.

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Otro Tiempo Otro Planeta (Other Time Other Planet)

 

Description of the project: This project develops a locally organized safe waste disposal system for used cooking oil, transformed in biodiesel. It creates employment for women who have been victims of gender violence, and contributes to the reduction of water pollution and CO2 emissions. Otro Tiempo’s objective is to empower women economically and socially. In 2015, the association had 130 clients, and 3 full time women employees. It forecasts to increase the volume of disposed cooking oil collected to 90 tons by December 2016, and employ two new women in 2017.

Climate Impact: Used cooking oil is a problematic waste. Its inadequate disposal can result in harmful environmental impacts, by hindering sewage treatment and polluting ecosystems. In 2015 we collected 34 tons of waste cooking oil (WCO) and produced 30,473 liters of biodiesel. Biodiesel made of WCO produces 86% less greenhouse than petro-diesel. Our project has facilitated the home recycling of 2,084 houses. By 2016 it is planned to withdraw 102 tons of WCO, avoiding the contamination of 102.564 million liters of water, and producing 92,304 liters of biodiesel. This will prevent the emission of 246 tons of CO2 compared to petro-diesel.

Gender Impact: The objective is to empower women victims of gender violence economically and improve their living conditions and consequently the livehoods of their families. Otro tiempo provides training and income to women, offering them an opportunity to rebuild their lives. In 2015, the association has been able to hire three women, and expects to hire seven women by 2018.

Scalability /replicability: All the different steps and methodology for collecting waste cooking oil can be replicated very easily. There are three main steps: 1. Distribute bottles and containers at the collection points 2. During the distribution, conduct awareness raising on climate change and educate on the fight against gender-based violence. 3. The oil is delivered in containers and transported to the treatment unit for the production of biodiesel.

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