Women as drivers of change for sustainable food consumption and production

Description of the project: Started in 2012, this project aims to empower women and local communities to address food security problems under climate change. This is achieved in four ways: 1) mobilizing women to adopt a low-carbon food consumption lifestyle through workshops; 2) supporting women to launch climate change campaigns in their communities; 3) providing a free online map to promote local food sourcing from “green spots”; 4) drawing the government’s attention on food education in communities and schools.

Climate Impact: In the past decade, the number and the intensity of typhoons have escalated, threatening Taiwan’s food supply. Homemakers United Foundation has convinced 580 small farmers to use NON-GMO seeds and sustainable farming practices. Between 2012 and 2016, 100 food education programs have been held in Taipei, Taichung and Kaohsiung, with 4,000+ moms and members of the local communities participating. In 2015 a “Green Food Community Online Map”, was launched, mobilizing youth on an “anti-climate change” action on a daily basis.

Gender Impact: In Taiwan, women are aware of climate change and are drivers of change. Homemakers United Foundation enables 700+ women to launch and lead various food education programs in primary schools, universities, and their communities. Women are empowered to trigger behavioral change towards sustainable food consumption and production (reducing food waste, eating locally and seasonally, sourcing locally to urban farming etc.)

Scalability / replicability: The educational programs use simple and easy tools such as picture books, cooking recipe, online maps, which are easy to replicate in communities. The HUF also published open-source handbooks, to foster expansion in more primary schools, universities or communities. Three food education exchange platforms have been created to promote low carbon food consumption.

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Light Up Skatang Tribe With Renewable Energy

Description of the project: “Light Up Skatang Tribe With Renewable Energy” was initiated by Skatang youth who collaborated with Tainan Community College. Skatang is a remote indigenous tribe where women make up 2/3 of its population. This project utilizes solar energy to improve the living conditions in the Skatang tribe while protecting their sustainable living traditions. It promotes women’s access to renewable energy by training them on the installation, maintenance and use of solar PV systems. The project foresees the creation of a 100% solar-powered tribe center in the community. It will raise awareness of the broad public on energy justice in Taiwan.

Climate Impact: Diesel generators are the main source of energy in the Skatang tribe. Each household consumes about 0.4 liters of diesel for lighting every day, which equals to 1.05 kilograms of carbon emission per household per day. After the installation of solar PV systems, the carbon reduction is about 5,7 t CO2 per year. Thus the solar PV system has a climate mitigation impact and improves the Skatang tribe’s resilience to climate change.

Gender Impact: The project reduces women’s domestic labor burden: tribal women noted that the Solar PV System effectively saves their time and energy, which can be used for other income generating or educational activities. Further, the technical trainings on the use of solar PV systems allow women to build their own capacities in renewable energy technology.

Scalability / replicability: The three steps methodology of this project makes it easily replicable: needs assessment, installation of solar PV systems and women’s capacity building program. The cooperation of Skatang youth with Tainan Community University enhances the goal to upscale the project to a 100% renewable energy powered community center and a self-sufficient indigenous tribe.

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