Bioloos: climate-friendly, sustainable gender responsive toilets

Description of the project: The project enables access to safe & sustainable sanitation to women and their families, school children and rail passengers. Women suffer disproportionately from lack of sanitation. Bioloo improves their security and dignity by providing gender- sensitive and climate-friendly affordable toilet systems. Banka Bioloo is a social enterprise founded by a woman, Manita Banka. She has implemented Bioloos in 2000 schools/households and 2000 trains; thus benefitting over 10000 adults, 50000 school children, and 60,000 daily train travellers.

Climate Impact: The bioloo disposes human waste in a 100% eco-friendly manner, saves energy and water (no flush toilet) and produces bio-gas. It treats the human waste as a resource that can be re-used, and removes the need for transport of the faeces. It prevents contamination of groundwater with pathogens, and does not require any external infrastructure. The bioloos are a great technical solution for climate mitigation and adaptation.

Gender Impact: The bioloo social enterprise is led by a woman working with grass-root communities, ensuring that women’s needs are taken into account. Women are the biggest beneficiaries of the bioloo as it is documented that lack of sanitation exposes women to violence and health risks, and reduces their access to school. Women are consulted at the starting phase and are active partners in the project implementation. Financial support is organized for poor women-headed households. Banka BioLoo works to create programs and projects towards advancement of women.

Scalability /replicability: Banka BioLoo’s model is scalable and replicable across geographical areas or terrains; suited for all income groups and social backgrounds; for urban, peri-urban and rural areas; beaches; or hilly areas – almost anywhere. The bacteria used can withstand temperatures from -5°C to 50°C. Since 2012, the social enterprise has installed bioloos in 20 Indian states and has developed partnerships with other organisations. Bioloo is currently working on ways to take the bio-digester technology to other countries, such as in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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South-south, grassroots women based technology transfer for solar electricity

Description of the project: The project is a gender responsive green energy project which focuses on providing low cost solar electricity to grassroots communities. It is based on south-south technology transfer by women organizations with capacity building on environmental conservation and alternative income generating activities. It improves community livelihood with 98 solar electrified households direct beneficiaries, and 500 inhabitants through improved revenues. It empowers women through trainings and active participation.

Climate Impact: Emissions reduction through the use of solar energy for electricity in 98 households; re-planting of 5000 indigenous fruit trees on 50ha of deforested land. Awareness raising on environmental conservation. Reduced human pressure on forests, reduced indoor air pollution and environmental hazards.

Gender Impact: Using a gender approach through the cooperation of women’s organizations from 2 south countries : India (Barefoot College) and Cameroon. 4 trained grandmother engineers shared their knowledge with 17 local community members (12 women, 5 young men). Additionally, women farmers were trained on tree-planting and sustainable production of non-timber forest products. Women participate equally in decision-making and implementation. Improved household income through reduced electricity costs. Women’s empowerment through the creation of green jobs, and increased solidarity among community members.

Scalability /replicability: The project will be up-scaled in 2 more communities with over 300 households (1300 inhabitants). The replicability is ensured by the cooperation with Barefoot College grandmothers network, as they train grassroots women and support local community councils.

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Drinking from the clouds: women and men transform dew and fog into potable water

Description: The village Ait Baamrane, bordering the Sahara Desert, can no longer rely on well-water as it was depleted by overuse, poor management, and increasing droughts. This fog water harvesting project is based on technology inspired by ancestral knowledge on dew and fog collecting. It provides potable water to over 400 people. Reduced labour burden for women enables them to create income generating activities. DSH Water School also provides beneficiary villages with children’s learning programs on environment and STEM education – Science, Technology, Engineering.

Climate impact: By facilitating sustainable access to water in this arid region, an adaptation mechanism has been designed. Women in the communities have put in place a sustained environmental monitoring system. Harvesting dew and fog-water reduces the use of fossil fuels and the need for digging boreholes that depletes deep-aquifer water. Keeping their grazing animals and bees are vital for the maintenance of the cycle of Argan trees and the unique ecosystem of the region (Sahara and Atlantic intersection).

Gender Impact: Harvesting fog water in homes significantly reduces women and girls’ hard labour burden for water collection from distant sources. Girl’s time for school and education has improved. DSH has also started a female mentoring and leadership program to encourage girls to stay in school after adolescence. Women’s empowerment is realized through capacity building on environmental monitoring and knowledge transfer on engineering skills. Women have engaged in new income-generating activities.

Scalability /replicability: Ten years of applied research and feasibility studies by DSH confirm that harvesting fog can be expanded to other sites. Current beneficiaries are ambassadors for the concept in Morocco. Where the climate is suitable, DSH is supporting the building of other locally-led fog projects through transfer of knowledge, extensive open-source materials and outreach (manual in French & Arabic) for replication and scalability.

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Women and school children install and use solar cookers to preserve the Argan forest

Description of the project: The Union of Women Cooperatives for Argan Oil (UCFA) and the Foundation have been working together since 2013 to install and disseminate solar cookers among populations of Southern Morocco, as a means of preventing deforestation of argan trees, reducing CO2 emissions, and avoiding toxic wood fire fumes. They raise awareness among pupils and their mothers about local climate issues and the advantages of using solar energy. Children and women are trained in the schools to assemble cookers (delivered in kits) and on their use. Finally the cookers are transferred to the families, where women adopt them with enthusiasm.

Climate Impact: Thanks to solar technology, CO2 emissions and toxic fumes caused by wood burning are significantly reduced. The simple and affordable technical solution makes solar energy accessible to women and local populations. The project contributes to the fight against deforestation and its climate consequences: 5 to 10 kg of wood are saved per day and per cooker.

Gender Impact: The project enables the reduction of unpaid wood collecting chores for women and young girls, which has a direct impact on their education, health and empowerment. The use of safe and clean solar technology, also has a positive impact on women’s health. UCFA and the Foundation strengthen the capacity of women through training of facilitators to disseminate the cookers in the schools, and planned future creation of a local small enterprise for the manufacture of cooker kits. At least 50% of the enterprise’s workforce will be women.

Scalability/replicability: The project methodology has been tested over the course of three pilot operations (120 cookers distributed) and evaluated in 2016. Local facilitators, women and men, have been trained to support schoolchildren and women  in the adoption phase. The solar cooker kits can be manufactured locally, involving women: the UCFA partners and Foundation,  are planning the creation of a local business in 2017-2018.

 

 

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