Muong women act for biodiversity conservation and better lives through organic farming

Description of the project: CECAD empowers over 300 ethnic Muong women of the Hoa Binh province in Northern Vietnam to switch to organic agriculture and improve their climate resilience. Trainings focus on identifying and protecting native plant species, reducing chemical inputs and setting up a Participatory Guarantee System (PGS-certification) via an organic farmer support group, in order to ensure customer trust. Start-up Clubs were set up to train 30 women on entrepreneurship skills and build up small organic food businesses with a web portal to access new retail and markets. Muong women worked with local authorities on local policy development, raising their democratic rights. In total 10,000 people in 20 communities benefit from improved rights, resilience and livelihoods.

Climate impact: Shifting to organic farming practices has greatly reduced GHG emissions and pesticide use (4,800 liters since 2013). This reduced the pollution of underground water and soil as well as living organisms in the environment. Protecting these ecosystems contribute to increased climate resilience for land and people. Organic and traditional farming practices have been an important part of agriculture in Vietnam for centuries. Rehabilitating ancestral knowledge combined with agricultural innovation with worldwide recognition (PGS) is appropriate, especially for isolated ethnic minorities who have to rely on local adapted means.

Gender impact: Participatory needs assessment and adapted training programmes have increased the agency of over 300 Muong women. The Start-up Clubs enabled them to create and lead their own entreprises, using modern internet technologies to reach out to more customers. Working with Women’s Union and local authorities, they are actively contributing to local decision making processes. This has promoted their status at home and in their communities, improving their democratic and socio-economic rights.

Scalability / replicability: CECAD has worked to establish a quality assurance system for organic products applying participatory monitoring throughout the value chain and involving farmers, customers and local authorities. While national policies on gender equality and sustainable agriculture support scalability throughout the province and other regions, local expertise and resources are also required. By involving women farmers, along with Women’s Union and District People’s Committees as major stakeholders, the project demonstrates decentralized, feasible and sustainable practices.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Ancestral know-how and innovative technologies help women producers of salt and rice preserve the mangroves

Description of the project: The DEDURAM project aims to improve the livelihoods of women and communities in the mangroves of Guinea-Bissau, through sustainable management of space, energy and natural resources. North-South knowledge exchange and capacity-building of women producers contribute to structure and develop the salt and rice value chain in the mangroves. 2000 family farms, 75% of which are managed by women, have adopted sustainable production methods (solar energy, reduced water consumption), thanks to the sharing of ancestral know-how and innovative techniques. 1500 women and 500 men have gained in autonomy through increased revenues and their integration into the local economy, while adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Climate impact: The traditional salt production technique – by heating brine – uses 3 tons of firewood for each ton of salt. By introducing the ancestral solar method used in the salt marshes of Brittany, Universsel has enabled women in Guinea to produce 4000 t. of salt while protecting 24 ha. of mangrove forests. Efficient water management in rice-growing areas has favoured the rehabilitation of abandoned rice paddies while increasing rice yield. This innovation, combined with geo-referenced monitoring, helps to preserve the biodiversity of a fragile ecosystem, and prevents further deforestation of the mangrove.

Gender impact: Salt is exclusively produced by women in Guinea-Bissau. 1500 of them have gained skills in a new solar technique, but also in sales, financial management, microcredit and the structuring into cooperatives. They enjoy better living and working conditions and greater recognition within a patriarchal society. They have become actively involved in the protection of their ecosystem as their cultural horizons have been broadened through exchange visits to France and Senegal, and they have been empowered within organized associations of women salt producers.

Scalability / replicability: DEDURAM promotes two innovative techniques which are affordable and easy to adopt by women producers in Guinea Conakry, Guinea Bissau and soon in Senegal. The beneficiaries cooperate with local professional organisations and Government agencies. In order to ensure the sustainability and scaling up of the adopted technologies, rice areas management committees and women producers associations have worked together to draw up a capacity-building plan including the preservation of the mangrove and climate resilience measures.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Inclusive, sustainable waste management in Delhi

Description of the project
The inhabitants and entreprises of Delhi are generating excessive waste and civic authorities have no systematic sustainable waste management in place. A survey conducted in BudhVihar, a colony located in southwest Delhi, reflected that the locality has improper waste & drainage system, water logging, health issues and each household on an average generates around 1 kg of kitchen waste everyday. To address this challenge, AIWC is training women from the locality in waste separation and home based compost system. They produce manure in a cycle of 45 days with ‘Khamba”, with a set of 3 earthen pots kept on top of each other. Layer of waste and cocopeat is filled in the pots on rotation and after decay, the waste turns into organic manure.

Climate impact
Dumping of waste in landfill or burning it releases carbon dioxide and pollutes the environment. According to the Press Information Bureau, India generates 62 million tonnes of mixed waste containing both recyclable and non-recyclable every year, with an average annual growth rate of 4% (PIB 2016). This project aims to mitigate GHG emission at micro level, sensitize the targeted household and support a sustainable waste management system at source.

Gender impact
The women from the Delhi suburb community were informed on various issues relating to waste, including health hazards. They were also trained to package and sell the manure to other households and local markets, either as manure or with sapling planted in a small pot. The project raises women’s technical skills and knowledge, and their capacities in generating income activities, as well as implementing preventive health measures.

Scalability
The project is cost effective and replicable at household level, as well as in other similar communities. It can also be scaled up to a community based waste management system, using the business model of compost pits and lead to a proper waste management system within the area.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Rural Tajik women implementing the Sustainable Development Goals of Agenda2030

Description of the project: WECF and Youth Ecological Center (YEC) empower Tajik rural women groups to boost the energy transition and agro-ecology in their villages. 155 women and 11 men from 4 rural organizations participated in technical trainings on sustainable water and sanitation, organic agriculture, homemade efficient stoves and solar technologies. Greenhouses allow farmers to grow vegetables and fruit seedlings and protect crops from climate impacts. Thanks to WECF’s Women2030 training tools used by YEC, the women gained knowledge on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and contributed to writing a shadow report on SDG implementation in Tajikistan, making gender focused policy recommendations in national consultation meetings. YEC and WECF encourage the rural women to create their own enterprise for a sustainable local economy.

Climate impact: Tajikistan’s forest cover has been halved in 50 years, due to heavy use of fuel wood. Coal production is planned to increase tenfold by 2030. 90 % of the soil surface is degraded. Transition to safe renewable energy and food production lacks institutional and financial support. This project develops accessible and affordable renewable energy technologies and organic farming skills for rural populations. Improved stoves, ecological insulation and solar water heaters help reduce CO2 emissions by 1ton per household per year, while solar greenhouses contribute to energy transition.

Gender impact: Gender stereotypes and traditional gender roles still prevail in Tajikistan. Discrimination in the labor market is strong, with most women being informally employed in agriculture. The project empowers women via technical trainings in innovative energy and agricultural technologies. With the acquired skills they gain a greater social status and become role models for others. Furthermore, their new revenues improve their financial independence and allow them to participate in local and national governance.

Scalability/replicability: Linking practical trainings with policy processes and boosting the emergence of a sustainable local economy is a good basis for up-scaling. YEC and WECF enable women groups from different villages to exchange their experience and learn from each other, as well as to actively contribute to transition policies. Tutorial videos have been produced to disseminate the technologies further. The technical equipment is designed on site and materials are locally sourced, so that the women can easily pass on their skills and competences to others.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Anglophone African women’s voices are heard by the Green Climate Fund

Description of the project: The effort mobilizes the active participation of grassroots women for gender-responsive climate finance and access to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) through a country driven approach. The African GCF gender monitors participate in the GCF board meetings and ensure local women’s voices and concerns are reflected in GCF policy issues as well as funding proposals. The regional Anglophone Africa monitor also mobilizes local women’s voices through country gender monitors who facilitate engagement and access to GCF. Coordinated by Center for 21st Century Issues and supported by WEDO and Both ENDS, as a member of the Global Alliance for Green and Gender Action (GAGGA), this regional project emerged from the collaborative work on “Participation is Power: Women Demand Gender Just Climate Finance.”

Climate impact: The GCF is a designated multilateral financing channel under the UNFCCC to implement the Paris Agreement and the Nationally Determined Contributions of developing countries. With an initial resource mobilization of $10.3 billion and another $9.7 billion already pledged for 2020-2023, the GCF has an undeniable ability to shape climate action and climate resilient development. The fund’s simplified approval process and Enhanced Direct Access approach strategically position it as a vehicle for transformative projects on climate change that engage women’s groups and local actors.

Gender impact: The Anglophone African GCF Gender Monitor participates in GCF board meetings to represent African voices, reviewing projects and seeking feedback from the African network, which currently has 95 members. Country monitors in 6 Anglophone African countries engage in the GCF at local levels. Webinars attract attendees across Africa as well as later viewings. This project was recognized as one of the best practices in empowering local women to drive climate finance during the workshop ‘Access to Climate Finance and Good Practices’ of the Climate Chance African Summit in October 2019.

Scalability: This effort can scale-up by recruiting more country monitors, working for better support for country level engagement, and building the capacity of local women’s groups. With Africa having the largest share of proposals in the pipeline, readiness projects, and approved projects, there are many opportunities for local women’s groups to effectively monitor existing or upcoming projects. Organizing more African wide webinars to share climate finance information and feedback from GCF board meetings will increase awareness about engagement in gender-responsive climate finance.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Gender Climate Tracker

Description of the project
The Gender Climate Tracker (GCT) platform is an online app and website designed to provide policymakers and advocates with data and information related to both the process and outcomes of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. With a rich, country-level dataset on women’s participation as delegates and heads of delegations, a catalog of each gender mandate decided within the UNFCCC negotiations, and gender analyses of the initial Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), this resource provides a landing site for understanding, tracking, and analyzing the effective implementation of gender-responsive climate policy.

Climate impact
The GCT enables climate negotiators and observers to seek and identify information for their advocacy. Women’s participation and leadership, contributes to better environmental outcomes. Previous decisions are critical to shaping new negotiation text: having mandates searchable at the click of a button can strengthen gender-responsive measures within the UNFCCC. Country-level planning and practice is a key feature of the effectiveness of these negotiations, monitoring gender and inclusivity within the NDCs can only contribute to the effectiveness of their implementation.

Gender impact
The GCT provides data and information to track and analyze gender-responsive policymaking; foster accountability to principles of gender justice, women’s rights, and inclusivity; and enable accurate and targeted advocacy. The platform brings visibility to gender and climate issues, collates complex information with clarity and interactive features, and offers a space for policymakers and civil society to contribute relevant country-level resources, thereby catalyzing additional attention and effort toward gender-responsive climate policy and practice.

Scalability
The platform is expanding in terms of features and followers, creating and housing additional resources for civil society and policymakers to understand, track, and analyze gender within related environmental spaces. More contributions will ensure these community-sourced catalogs to cultivate advocacy and accountability. Showcasing gender mandates across multilateral environmental agreements promotes cross-cutting approaches to gender-responsive policy, while continued analysis of gender within new NDCs will facilitate monitoring and accountability.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women smallholders mango farming enterprises as resilience strategy

Description of the project: This project strengthens the resilience of 6,000 smallholder farmers and rural communities through the sustainable production and transformation of high quality, drought resistant green mango varieties into mango achaar. Hebron Mango Tree Owner Primary and Vhembe Agro-Processing Cooperatives are building the capacity of women smallholder farmers to create their own enterprise and diversify their income sources outside the mango season. These enterprises will be developed with participatory methodologies to ensure a gender-responsive implementation of viable, culturally appropriate and marketable diversified activities.

Climate impact: The project improves the climate resilience of grassroots communities as they breed drought adapted fruit trees and develop local sustainable product transformation based on an inclusive business model. Furthermore, the creation of diversified enterprises ensures the use of a wide variety of crops, thus contributing to preserving the local biodiversity. Farmers are trained to use rainwater-harvesting techniques and to manage accurate weather monitoring systems, to adapt to severe climate impacts.

Gender impact: In order to close the gender gap in the communities, women are empowered to possess undisputed knowledge in organic farming methods, irrigation technologies and mango processing. They also gain strong leadership and entrepreneurship skills via trainings on basic financial management, governance and marketing strategy. They benefit from the cooperative model that facilitates access to markets and the value chain. The project brings women to the forefront in the fight against climate change, poverty and inequality.

Scalability/replicability: Provincial and local authorities are actively involved and the private sector as off-takers of the mango products plays a key role in ensuring scalability of this initiative, which can contribute to South Africa’s National Adaptation Strategy and Green Economy Strategy, especially in terms of innovation and job creation. The objective is to extend to other regions of the country and further strengthen the domestic mango value chains with a social and gender-responsive philosophy.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Getting to work on climate – CHANGE

Description of the project: CHANGE trains women with degrees from non-German universities to become climate advocates. The project enables highly qualified women with a migration background to be integrated into future-oriented careers and strengthens their influence in dealing with the impacts of climate change. They get to know the affected sectors, become aware of their professional and personal resources, and learn how to use them in their future professional field. Integrated technical and language learning improves their communication at work. Workshops on self-presentation, conflict management, and reconciling family and career prepare them for their roles as force multipliers in companies and communities.

Climate impact: Women from diverse cultural backgrounds are qualified to take responsibility for the future, to comprehend social, economic, and ecological developments, and to shape their professional activities accordingly. They are empowered to develop visions to face the changes caused by climate change. They bring with them indispensable experiences and perspectives from their countries of origin, which serve as important contributions to interdisciplinary solutions for climate adaptation and protection.

Gender impact: For LIFE, gender equality and equal opportunity mean the empowerment of women and girls as outlined in the SDG 5. We support women from all cultures in their professional development and offer customized information relevant to the labor market, career counseling, and integrated language support. In the CHANGE project, these principles are placed in the context of climate change in order to qualify women as mentors for climate change adaptation and to promote gender equality.

Scalability / replicability: The project represents a synergy of the local requirements for climate adaptation in the city of Berlin with the resources and experiences from the participants’ countries of origin, where climate change sometimes presents completely different challenges. This model is promising for the future due to its global approach, by countering climate change impacts through local measures that have grown out of experiences in diverse cultural contexts. In this way, learning outcomes from the global South and the global North intertwine.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Building an efficient solar drying technology for women farmers’ economic empowerment

Description of the project: WEP has built a pilot solar dryer tent in Adogo village, Nigeria. The main objective of this innovative equipment if to improve the drying process of agricultural and sea products such as pepper, tomatoes, fish etc. through a healthier and controlled method. The pilot dryer responds to the specific needs of poor farmers – mostly women. The initiative promotes entrepreneurship and women’s economic empowerment, increases access to food and resources, and boosts commercial activities. It also improves hygiene and health, since the produce are dried in a controlled environment preventing contaminations by pests. It avoids spoilage of farm produce and has reduced the labour burden for women.

Climate impact: The use of the solar tent helps rural farmers adapt to climate impacts and increases their resilience through a more regular provision of food in the year. Protected by the tent, agricultural products can be dried even under unpredictable weather conditions occasioned by climate change. This equipment enables farmers to preserve vegetables, fruits and plants even under damp conditions. At least 4 tonnes of perishable agricultural products can be dried and stored at a time. The solar technology reduces the use of firewood to smoke fish, thus cutting CO2 emissions.

Gender impact: The solar dryer tent is a closed, secured equipment that saves a significant amount of time for women when drying farm produce, as they no longer need to guard the products and chase animals away. This created new economic opportunities, improved livelihoods, health, and safety. WEP has trained 30 women farmers on solar installation and entrepreneurship. Dried produce are sold with a good value added, generating additional income for families. The women have taken the responsibility of managing the project.

Scalability/replicability: WEP intends to replicate this pilot initiative in many rural communities in Nigeria and other African countries, based on performance tests and a construction model using locally sourced materials. Trainings will be organized on solar tent construction and the packaging of dried products as well as sales strategies. In line with the objectives of the national Economic Recovery and Growth Plan, WEP will collaborate with the government to develop the solar drying technology and reduce post-harvest wastage in several regions.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women farmers transforming livelihoods in the drought-prone Marathwada region of India

Description of the project: The project promotes the recognition of 60 000 rural women as farmers and decision makers, with improved participation in agriculture and within households. It builds resilience in small, marginalised farming households through capacity building in resilient farming practices. Women’s agency is enhanced through land tenure rights, leadership development workshops and participatory governance. The beneficiaries take decisions and shift from cash crops to diversified mixed food crops and vegetables. They can give up chemical inputs for bio-inputs, use local seeds, follow water and soil conservation methods, and diversify food sources to enhance nutrition and income security.

Climate impact: In the last three years, 60,000 women from small and marginalised farmer households have shifted from water-guzzling cash crops such as soya, sugarcane and cotton, to cultivating and consuming local food crops through the year. Instead of monocultures, they grow 7 to 8 crops and plant fruit trees. The initiative has reduced input costs by 25%; the savings makes farming economically viable. The conversion of 50,000 acres of dry land into bio-farms through water and soil conservation practices is leading to improved biodiversity.

Gender impact: Change expected from this initiative is women’s leadership, enhanced with technical knowledge and skills, in new social identities as climate champions and decision makers in farms, families and communities. At the heart of this approach is women’s complete autonomy around what to grow, what to consume and how much to sell. From the identity as farm workers, women have gained new economic and social statute as entrepreneurs, grassroots advocates and climate leaders.

Scalability/replicability: Locally-owned action by women’s groups led to design this holistic and integrated model to address the intersectional challenges of climate change, land degradation, food, water and livelihood insecurity. The project strengthens the leadership of women grassroots advocates to forge partnerships with government, agricultural universities and training institutions. As per a directive of the Government of India, 30% of State funds for agriculture must be allocated to women farmers. This can aid replication and upscaling.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

P3 – Women’s entrepreneurship and traditional know-how help recycle plastic and stop pollution in Ouahigouya

Description of the project: The P3 project – Plastic, Project, Pochette – fights against plastic pollution in the city of Ouahigouya by training young women in creative recycling of water bags, and promoting local know-how from Burkina Faso. Plastic bags, which pollute the soil and water sources, are collected and reprocessed in a creative range of fashionable accessories. Their sale on local and international markets provides a decent income to 22 women beneficiaries. Movement France creates stable jobs, improves living conditions, and stimulates a green and local economy. Thanks to a wide network of partners and a responsible ethical vision, conveyed through awareness-raising actions, this association promotes a sustainable and inclusive development approach.

Climate impact: The proliferation of plastic in the city and surrounding areas has significant health impacts on livestock and people, causing ecological damage, including GHG emissions. Citizens mobilization actions make it possible to collect about 300 kg of plastic per month. The recycling process chosen by Movement France, as well as all its activities, are part of a resilient approach, including the choice of sustainable construction materials, a photovoltaic installation, and the use of natural and biodegradable detergents for the treatment of plastics.

Gender impact: P3 currently ensures better living conditions to 22 employed women, providing their children with access to schooling and care. Freed from poverty, women are trained at all stages of the manufacturing process and involved in the orientation and implementation of the project through monthly participatory meetings. The structure gives young mothers the opportunity to organize their daily working time according to their availability, guaranteeing them great autonomy and flexibility in their work.

Scalability/replicability: Thanks to a virtuous business model and sustainable production methods, this project can be replicated in Burkina Faso and in countries facing plastic pollution. Technical training based on local knowledge is accessible; enhanced living standards ensure the commitment of beneficiaries. Movement France is creating with local builders an Artisanal Plastic Recycling Centre in Ouahigouya -CARPO- based on an ancient Egyptian vault technique using natural materials such as earth and stones. This center aims to create 40 jobs by 2020.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women promoting clean energy on the roof of the world

Description of the project: This project in upper Bartang valley, Pamir, Tajikistan improves the life of women and local communities through efficient use of natural resources with affordable sustainable energy technologies. The project supports 55 women and their vulnerable families in 5 communities. Women and men participated in awareness raising and technical trainings, including exhibitions on sustainable energy solutions, workshops on the construction of solar water heaters and food dryers, trainings on women’s empowerment and a study tour in other villages. In all, 55 efficient cooking stoves, 75 parabolic solar cookers, 40 solar lanterns, 55 pressure cookers and 2 solar water heaters were distributed in the target villages. Additionally, 300 tree seedlings will be planted to regenerate the forest.

Climate impact: Renewables and resource efficient technologies such as solar ovens and water heaters, pressure cookers, or improved stoves significantly reduce firewood consumption (at least by 3 tons/year/family), mitigating CO2 emissions and indoor pollution, and improving comfort and sanitation. The reforestation component will help to reverse climate change impacts in an area that has suffered from an acceleration of desertification due to deforestation.

Gender impact: Little Earth focuses on empowering women as problem solvers and new technology experts and leaders. With extra hours gained during the day, on chores like gathering wood, and in the evenings, thanks to solar lanterns, women can pursue new sources of income such as embroidery or knitting. Children can study and stay in school. With additional income, beneficiaries can diversify and improve family diets, ensuring food security and better nutrition. Women are seen as valuable contributors in the communities, changing social dynamics for the better.

Scalability: Promoting affordable, low-tech and adapted renewable energy technologies to isolated, off-grid communities that are severely impacted by climate change is a model that can be replicated in many similar regions. Little Earth partners with another NGO and with local authorities. They would like to extend this initiative throughout the Bartang Valley and in other mountainous areas of Tajikistan, where patriarchal structures prevent change. Empowering women as problem solvers and leaders in their communities transforms the social dynamics and paves the way for stronger resilience.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Spotless Dame – combating menstrual hygienic poverty while reducing plastic waste

Description of the project: This project addresses the interconnected challenges of plastic waste, extreme poverty, unhygienic practices during menstruation, and sustainable livelihoods. It enables adolescent girls and community women to lead healthy lives by breaking myths and taboos surrounding menstruation and creating awareness about healthy practices. More than 6,500 Mera Pads -reusable cloth pads made from bamboo- have been distributed. Their production and sales have created new jobs for 25 women, improving the livelihoods of their families. Over 7,500 women and girls have been trained in menstrual hygiene through 92 Workshops in 30 villages across 8 districts of Rajasthan. Awareness raising programs were also organised for boys and men to break the cycle of menstrual discrimination.

Climate impact: Disposable sanitary pads result in the unsustainable discharge of millions of tonnes of plastic waste all over the world, which are nearly non biodegradable. One woman using disposable pads and tampons for menstrual hygiene will generate around 150 kg of plastic waste during her entire life, with an estimated carbon footprint of 900 kg CO2. This project has thus far supported 1,626 women with 6,504 reusable cloth pads, saving 31,219 kg of plastic waste and substantially reducing carbon emissions.

Gender impact: Access to safe menstrual hygiene can be a matter of life and death. Patriarchal discrimination of menstruating women still prevails in India. With affordable, sustainable alternative pads, this project has created jobs, improved the life of 1,626 women and raised the capacity of 7,500 girls and women on menstrual hygiene management. Programs to sensitise boys and men break gender taboos. Pragati Sakhis -environmental ambassadors- are selected to educate and empower women in their communities on environment and health.

Scalability: Started in one village in 2015, Spotless Dame has already been replicated in 30 locations from 8 districts. Pragati Sakhis -environmental ambassadors- endorse the role of multiplicators and ensure up-scaling. The business model based on a sustainable production with local materials and local people is easy to replicate. By 2030, the non-profit organisation aims to provide 1 million women with Mera Pads, creating sustainable jobs for at least 1,000 women.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women waste pickers and community organisations of Bogota building a sustainable and inclusive city

Description of the Project: Started in 2012, this initiative shows the way for a sustainable and gender-responsive city, based on formalizing the activities of 26 women waste pickers as recyclers in Suba, in the south suburbs of Bogota. On this basis, ENDA involved 9 community organisations -3520 citizens- to elaborate a holistic urban concept, including participatory territorial planning, urban gardening, cultural and artistic activities and the creation of ‘Bankomunal’ – a community savings and credit initiative for women who do not have access to formal banking. Training in environmental management, gender inequalities and masculinities, local public policies and citizen’s initiatives, allows beneficiaries to exercise their democratic rights to protect their environment and cultural heritage, contributing to the Peace Process in Colombia.

Climate Impact: Thanks to the project 30 tons of paper and 12 tons of plastic are recycled annually, saving 120,000kwh of electricity, avoiding the deforestation of 600 trees and the accumulation of 4,000 kilos of garbage in the sanitary landfill. Paper and plastic are reused in the production of handicrafts for economic empowerment. Through the strengthening of community relations, productive organic terraces have been built, established as training centers for composting, seed banks, waste management and urban agriculture for self-consumption leading to significant climate mitigation results.

Gender Impact: Women recyclers have become environmental agents and providers of a public service with equal pay compared to men. Community women are recognized in their role as leaders for the transformation of urban practices having social, cultural and climate benefits. Participation empowers women and youth, as they are elected in the Community Action Board and in inter-institutional working groups. In this way they contribute to citizen’s monitored municipal budgeting and the implementation of public policies for the improvement of their neighbourhoods.

Scalability: The project indirectly benefits 9000 citizens and will be scaled up through partnerships with women and organisations from other suburbs. The urban gardening terraces are being multiplied via trainings of women leaders with the aim of creating a market for the commercialization of the vegetables and handicrafts. Establishing citizen monitoring of public policies has led to the nomination of a female community leader in the district council. This is key to reducing violence against women and to contribute to the peace building process in Colombia.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Rural woman in Yucatan committed to healthy harvests and smoke-free cooking

Project Desciption: In rural areas of Yucatán, the main economic activity is agriculture, a sector where women account for 70% of the workforce. They perform their daily work without any basic training, technology, financing and without the rights over the land they cultivate. Climate change has made this problem even worse, making it more difficult to break the cycle of poverty. The goal of this project is to empower women by giving them access to natural resources in their homes through biodigesters, developing skills that improve their farming practices and reduce the risks of respiratory diseases and the time needed for gathering firewood, protecting the forests and stopping the use of chemical fertilisers. For this, 599 biodigesters have been installed in Yucatán’s indigenous communities.

Climate Impact: In 5 years, 432,897 m3 of biogas have been produced, reducing the use of firewood by 88%. Experience showed that manure transformed into energy eliminates a significant amount of CO2. The biodigesters have reduced 7,892 metric tons of animal waste that would have ended up in the aquifer. They produce 37 million litres of biofertiliser a year, for a fertilisation potential of approximately 567 ha/year, the equivalent of replacing 170,000 kg of synthetic fertilisers a year. This figure implies that the use of biofertiliser replaces the use of chemical fertilisers, as well as pesticides.

Gender Impact: Biodigesters, mainly managed by women, provide self-produced inputs that improve harvests and nutrition, breaking the cycle of extreme poverty and malnutrition in a period of climate change. Women participated in trainings and their voices were integrated into the generation of knowledge on climate change, rights and the use of clean energy. The systems adopted reduce the women’s health risks and financial stress and have an impact on energy and food safety, as well as on the diversification of productive farming activities.

Scalibility: The biodigesters can be replicated and are designed for small producers. They are mainly supplied with animal waste and require very little maintenance, helping the women and girls to save time to engage in other activities. The aim is to replicate knowledge through the creation of the first storage and treatment centre, called U ́Ka Muuk’ Lu’um, since 2017. The consolidation of this centre provides knowledge and space for these producers to find the tools for reproducing sustainable agricultural practices.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Women cooperatives of Ireli fight desertification in Mali

Description of the Project: This project, initiated in Mali by ADESAF and co-constructed with the local population, contributes to the fight against the silting up of arable land in an area threatened by desertification. This initiative guarantees access to land for 276 women farmers who have received arable land plots, and been trained in agro-ecological techniques. It has contributed to the creation of cooperatives that generate new income, while ensuring greater food security and climate resilience for the 4,280 inhabitants of Ireli village. The cooperatives and all project activities improve women’s participation in local, resilient development through capacity building and empowerment.

Climate Impact: Ireli is located more than 100 km from the Niger River, in an arid area. The Village Development Committee succeeded in setting 10 hectares of dunes by forming 4 dedicated teams of women and men. 80 people were trained in planting and conserving local plants fixing the dune, and 276 in agroecology, preserving water and the ecosystem, to maximize nature’s regenerative capacities. 2 hectares of vegetable plots are cultivated according to these methods, ensuring the population’s resilience to climate impacts.

Gender Impact: The 276 women farmers have formed 8 groups that benefit from arable plots and training in arboriculture and agro-ecological gardening, as well as marketing, accounting skills and cooperative management. A part of the sales of the cooperative’s production is reinvested, while the rest improves the farmers’ incomes. Training courses strengthen women’s participation and role in decision-making instances. They elect their own presidents and managers independently. Their legitimacy is recognized by all villagers.

Scalibility: The collaboration with a local association and the support of the Sangha Town Hall ensure a good territorial anchoring. An appropriate economic model and good governance strengthens the autonomy of the inhabitants in managing the actions. Capitalization work was carried out through interviews and studies. The women also benefited from the experience of Tireli’s women farmers, who conducted a similar program. The community intends to scale-up by involving unemployed youth in Sangha and improving the incomes of cooperatives.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Game changing rice culture empowers rural women to ensure food security in South Odisha

Description of the project: Pragati Koraput works with over 8000 ethnic women farmers in Koraput District, India, to ensure climate resilient nutritional food security. Activities include training on water saving System of Rice Intensification (SRI) for rice and millets, organic crop diversification with access to indigenous stress tolerant seeds, farm mechanization, and organized collectives for market access. The project has enhanced women’s position as change agents in the family and community. It has also increased the communities’ understanding of climate impacts on agriculture and the importance of proper conservation and use of resources for climate resilience.

Climate impact: System of Rice Intensification (SRI) creates aerobic soil conditions through shallow and intermittent irrigation, which contributes to better crop yield and food security, drop in production costs, and reduced freshwater consumption (-40%). This remarkable water management system in rice paddies, as well as reduced use of chemical fertilizer have resulted in substantial methane reduction, with significant mitigation and adaptation impact.

Gender impact: Thanks to the training and mentoring activities, confidence and self-esteem have risen in the mind of 8,200 women beneficiaries from 315 villages. The initiative has created space for the women to participate in local, state and national forums. They take leadership roles in communities to discuss and act on climate issues impacting their lives. They motivate peers to adopt innovative technologies for resilient agriculture. Men in the villages acknowledge their significant contribution, which is transforming the gendered power relations.

Scalability: SRI has the potential to involve many more farmers across the region as it is a methodology with proven results. Replicating SRI organic practices can have far-reaching positive impacts on a large scale, such as increase in food production, releasing the financial burden on farmers and promoting a more sustainable economy, with improved nutritional food security. Applying the principles of SRI in other crops and crop diversification will revive biodiversity and protect soil and water quality.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Light Every Birth: solar suitcases for maternal health care

Description of the project: We Care Solar addresses global maternal-newborn health by providing reliable and renewable electricity to power the lighting, communication, and medical devices essential for obstetric care. Around the world, clinicians struggle in near-darkness to provide lifesaving care in facilities lacking electricity. The “Light Every Birth” initiative has brought solar suitcases to public health facilities throughout five African countries, equipping over 4,000 maternal health centers. The 12-volt DC solar electric system includes medical lights, headlamps, a fetal heart-rate monitor and installation hardware. This initiative facilitates timely, quality care for women and newborns in last-mile health centers; it is a model for gender-sensitive energy transition.

Climate impact: We Care Solar suitcases replace fossil fuel sources of lighting, such as candles, kerosene lanterns, oil wick lamps, and diesel fuel generators, reducing carbon dioxide formation, improving air quality, and removing the risk of fire. After deploying more than 4,000 solar suitcases in partnership with NGOs and UN agencies, about 40,000 tons of CO2 emissions could be reduced. By providing solar energy, the initiative is making rural health centers a model of renewable energy for communities.

Gender impact:
Foremost, the initiative improves life chances for women and newborns in regions with persistently high maternal and neonatal mortality rates and low rates of energy access. Due to the lack of female solar installers, a “Women Solar Ambassador” program was launched to develop training materials showcasing women as installers and to promote women trainers for capacity-building on solar installation and maintenance. An educational program encourages more girls to enter STEM fields.

Scalability: The solar suitcases as well as educational and capacity-building programs can be rolled-out in more areas. A best practice guide for scale-up has been developed in this regard. A replicable model includes sharing decision-making with local agencies, creating steering committees with key stakeholders, training local technicians and healthcare workers in solar maintenance, providing ongoing technical support, and ensuring eventual handover of the programs into local and national governments.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Empowered women ensure community-based forest preservation

Description of the project: Three organizations in the central districts of Nepal -Kathmandu, Makwanpur, and Sarlah- are promoting aromatic herb plantation and essential oil production, ecotourism, and handicraft development in 13 community forests over 1,375 hectares. More than 4000 households benefit from the project, contributing to surveying the trees, revising forest management plans, and establishing plant nurseries in conjunction with economic activities. Community based ecotourism policies were strengthened, and three women-led forestry enterprises were successfully registered and operated, producing market-recognized forest products to improve local livelihoods.

Climate impact: These nepalese districts suffer from deforestation due to rapid population growth, overuse of fuelwood, and clear felling under electric lines. Participatory development of new plans demonstrating sustainable forest management (SFM) practices, alongside capacity-building through SFM training, effectively counters the deforestation. Nurseries have supported the planting of 175,000 trees, and the distribution of improved cookstoves, including biogas units, reduces future fuelwood demand. Ecotourism policy-strengthening has also provided a foundation for SFM to continue.

Gender impact: 551 women have directly benefited from trainings, economic opportunities, and received appliances. Basic and advanced handicraft training led to two profitable enterprises. Along with an aromatic herb plantation, these enterprises are generating income and giving women greater autonomy over their daily spending. SFM training has supported the equal involvement of women in community forest monitoring and management. The additional distribution of solar panels for lighting and improved cookstoves has enabled more time flexibility, reduced fuel-gathering labor, and improved health.

Scalability: This work is able to be replicated to support women’s economic upliftment in Nepal. The plantation of aromatic herbs is particularly identified as a model for replication. The Government of Nepal’s emphasis on eco-tourism promotion, forest based enterprises and SFM will contribute to the sustainability and scalability of this approach. To reach policy makers and other audiences in Nepal, a wide range of communication tools were employed, including local media coverage, brochures and documentary filmmaking.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags:

Safeguarding Endorois people’s knowledge and ecosystems via an inclusive and autonomous governance protocol

Description of the project: This project supports the discriminated Endorois people around Lake Bogoria to articulate their own priorities and procedures for the conservation of their natural resources by developing a Biocultural Community Protocol (BCP). It documents the ancestral knowledge of Endorois women and men on their ecosystems and provides proactive responses to climate impacts, among other threats. It guides the community on collective engagement with external stakeholders on access, use and management of their endogenous resources, based on the legal framework of the Nagoya Protocol. The elected Endorois Welfare Council, representing all 17 target communities (up to 60 000 people), and respecting gender balance, contributes to the protection of genetic and biological resources, including the neighboring ecosystems due to the transboundary nature of ecological effects.

Climate impact: The BCP ensures the use of Indigenous knowledge to launch initiatives to adapt to climate impacts – droughts, loss of biodiversity, invasive species – and unlock multiple socio-economic benefits. The community has documented their traditional beliefs and indigenous knowledge and thus, the BCP is an intergenerational negotiation tool to address collaboration with external actors and provide solutions that safeguard and complement traditional knowledge for climate resilience and other key environmental issues.

Gender impact: The BCP adopts an inclusive strategy where women were included in leading positions in the governance structures and have become active agents in environmental conservation. Women actively participated in the negotiations and articulation of their rights, culture and traditions for natural resource management. The BCP clearly maps out women’s age-set, with separate representation of female youth and elderly, and recognizes their roles and rights with regards to conservation. Capacity-building also enhanced their understanding of policy, legal and institutional frameworks.

Scalability: The BCP strengthens the community’s capacity to use traditional knowledge to achieve sustainable natural resource management, and it aims to influence other Indigenous communities in similar circumstances, having positive impacts on neighboring territories. Such methodology can be replicated in many endangered ecosystems. The Endorois people are able to protect their rights and knowledge via collective engagement with external stakeholders. As a result, with a more cohesive society, they can avert possible conflict situations among members of the community arising from declining natural resources.

Organization:
Body:
Resource:
Language:
Tags: