Anglophone African women’s voices are heard by the Green Climate Fund

Description of the project
The effort mobilizes the active participation of grassroots women for gender-responsive climate finance and access to the Green Climate Fund (GCF) through a country driven approach. The African GCF gender monitors participate in the GCF board meetings and ensure local women’s voices and concerns are reflected in GCF policy issues as well as funding proposals. The regional Anglophone Africa monitor also mobilizes local women’s voices through country gender monitors who facilitate engagement and access to GCF. Coordinated by Center for 21st Century Issues and supported by WEDO and Both ENDS, as a member of the Global Alliance for Green and Gender Action (GAGGA), this regional project emerged from the collaborative work on “Participation is Power: Women Demand Gender Just Climate Finance.”

Climate impact
The GCF is a designated multilateral financing channel under the UNFCCC to implement the Paris Agreement and the Nationally Determined Contributions of developing countries. With an initial resource mobilization of $10.3 billion and another $9.7 billion already pledged for 2020-2023, the GCF has an undeniable ability to shape climate action and climate resilient development. The fund’s simplified approval process and Enhanced Direct Access approach strategically position it as a vehicle for transformative projects on climate change that engage women’s groups and local actors.

Gender impact
The Anglophone African GCF Gender Monitor participates in GCF board meetings to represent African voices, reviewing projects and seeking feedback from the African network, which currently has 95 members. Country monitors in 6 Anglophone African countries engage in the GCF at local levels. Webinars attract attendees across Africa as well as later viewings. This project was recognized as one of the best practices in empowering local women to drive climate finance during the workshop ‘Access to Climate Finance and Good Practices’ of the Climate Chance African Summit in October 2019.

Scalability
This effort can scale-up by recruiting more country monitors, working for better support for country level engagement, and building the capacity of local women’s groups. With Africa having the largest share of proposals in the pipeline, readiness projects, and approved projects, there are many opportunities for local women’s groups to effectively monitor existing or upcoming projects. Organizing more African wide webinars to share climate finance information and feedback from GCF board meetings will increase awareness about engagement in gender-responsive climate finance.

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Gender Climate Tracker

Description of the project
The Gender Climate Tracker (GCT) platform is an online app and website designed to provide policymakers and advocates with data and information related to both the process and outcomes of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. With a rich, country-level dataset on women’s participation as delegates and heads of delegations, a catalog of each gender mandate decided within the UNFCCC negotiations, and gender analyses of the initial Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), this resource provides a landing site for understanding, tracking, and analyzing the effective implementation of gender-responsive climate policy.

Climate impact
The GCT enables climate negotiators and observers to seek and identify information for their advocacy. Women’s participation and leadership, contributes to better environmental outcomes. Previous decisions are critical to shaping new negotiation text: having mandates searchable at the click of a button can strengthen gender-responsive measures within the UNFCCC. Country-level planning and practice is a key feature of the effectiveness of these negotiations, monitoring gender and inclusivity within the NDCs can only contribute to the effectiveness of their implementation.

Gender impact
The GCT provides data and information to track and analyze gender-responsive policymaking; foster accountability to principles of gender justice, women’s rights, and inclusivity; and enable accurate and targeted advocacy. The platform brings visibility to gender and climate issues, collates complex information with clarity and interactive features, and offers a space for policymakers and civil society to contribute relevant country-level resources, thereby catalyzing additional attention and effort toward gender-responsive climate policy and practice.

Scalability
The platform is expanding in terms of features and followers, creating and housing additional resources for civil society and policymakers to understand, track, and analyze gender within related environmental spaces. More contributions will ensure these community-sourced catalogs to cultivate advocacy and accountability. Showcasing gender mandates across multilateral environmental agreements promotes cross-cutting approaches to gender-responsive policy, while continued analysis of gender within new NDCs will facilitate monitoring and accountability.

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Getting to work on climate – CHANGE

Description of the projectCHANGE trains women with degrees from non-German universities to become climate advocates. The project enables highly qualified women with a migration background to be integrated into future-oriented careers and strengthens their influence in dealing with the impacts of climate change. They get to know the affected sectors, become aware of their professional and personal resources, and learn how to use them in their future professional field. Integrated technical and language learning improves their communication at work. Workshops on self-presentation, conflict management, and reconciling family and career prepare them for their roles as force multipliers in companies and communities.

Climate impact
Women from diverse cultural backgrounds are qualified to take responsibility for the future, to comprehend social, economic, and ecological developments, and to shape their professional activities accordingly. They are empowered to develop visions to face the changes caused by climate change. They bring with them indispensable experiences and perspectives from their countries of origin, which serve as important contributions to interdisciplinary solutions for climate adaptation and protection.

Gender impact
For LIFE, gender equality and equal opportunity mean the empowerment of women and girls as outlined in the SDG 5. We support women from all cultures in their professional development and offer customized information relevant to the labor market, career counseling, and integrated language support. In the CHANGE project, these principles are placed in the context of climate change in order to qualify women as mentors for climate change adaptation and to promote gender equality.

Scalability
The project represents a synergy of the local requirements for climate adaptation in the city of Berlin with the resources and experiences from the participants’ countries of origin, where climate change sometimes presents completely different challenges. This model is promising for the future due to its global approach, by countering climate change impacts through local measures that have grown out of experiences in diverse cultural contexts. In this way, learning outcomes from the global South and the global North intertwine.

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Women farmers transforming livelihoods in the drought-prone Marathwada region of India

Description of the project
The project promotes the recognition of 60 000 rural women as farmers and decision makers, with improved participation in agriculture and within households. It builds resilience in small, marginalised farming households through capacity building in resilient farming practices. Women’s agency is enhanced through land tenure rights, leadership development workshops and participatory governance. The beneficiaries take decisions and shift from cash crops to diversified mixed food crops and vegetables. They can give up chemical inputs for bio-inputs, use local seeds, follow water and soil conservation methods, and diversify food sources, to enhance nutrition and income security.

Climate impact
In the last three years, 60,000 women from small and marginalised farmer households have
shifted from water-guzzling cash crops such as soya, sugarcane and cotton, to cultivating
and consuming local food crops through the year. Instead of monocultures, they grow 7 to 8 crops and plant fruit trees. The initiative has reduced input costs by 25%; the savings makes farming economically viable. The conversion of 50,000 acres of dry land into bio-farms through water and soil conservation practices is leading to improved biodiversity.

Gender impact
Change expected from this initiative is women’s leadership, enhanced with technical knowledge and skills, in new social identities as climate champions and decision makers in farms, families and communities. At the heart of this approach is women’s complete autonomy around what to grow, what to consume and how much to sell. From the identity as farm workers, women have gained new economic and social statute as entrepreneurs, grassroots advocates and climate leaders.

Scalability
Locally-owned action by women’s groups led to design this holistic and integrated model to address the intersectional challenges of climate change, land degradation, food, water and livelihood insecurity. The project strengthens the leadership of women grassroots advocates to forge partnerships with government, agricultural universities and training institutions. As per a directive of the Government of India, 30% of State funds for agriculture must be allocated to women farmers. This can aid replication and upscaling.

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P3 – Women’s entrepreneurship and traditional know-how help recycle plastic and stop pollution in Ouahigouya

Description of the project
The P3 project -Plastic, Project, Pochette- fights against plastic pollution in the city of Ouahigouya by training young women in creative recycling of water bags, and promoting local know-how from Burkina Faso. Plastic bags, which pollute the soil and water sources, are collected and reprocessed in a creative range of fashionable accessories. Their sale on local and international markets provides a decent income to 22 women beneficiaries. Movement France creates stable jobs, improves living conditions, and stimulates a green and local economy. Thanks to a wide network of partners and a responsible ethical vision, conveyed through awareness-raising actions, this association promotes a sustainable and inclusive development approach.

Climate impact
The proliferation of plastic in the city and surrounding areas has significant health impacts on livestock and people, causing ecological damage, including GHG emissions. Citizens mobilization actions make it possible to collect about 300 kg of plastic per month. The recycling process chosen by Movement France, as well as all its activities, are part of a resilient approach, including the choice of sustainable construction materials, a photovoltaic installation, and the use of natural and biodegradable detergents for the treatment of plastics.

Gender impact
P3 currently ensures better living conditions to 22 employed women, providing their children with access to schooling and care. Freed from poverty, women are trained at all stages of the manufacturing process and involved in the orientation and implementation of the project through monthly participatory meetings. The structure gives young mothers the opportunity to organize their daily working time according to their availability, guaranteeing them great autonomy and flexibility in their work.

Scalability
Thanks to a virtuous business model and sustainable production methods, this project can be replicated in Burkina Faso and in countries facing plastic pollution. Technical training based on local knowledge is accessible; enhanced living standards ensure the commitment of beneficiaries. Movement France is creating with local builders an Artisanal Plastic Recycling Centre in Ouahigouya -CARPO- based on an ancient Egyptian vault technique using natural materials such as earth and stones. This center aims to create 40 jobs by 2020.

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Women promoting clean energy on the roof of the world

Description of the project: This project in upper Bartang valley, Pamir, Tajikistan improves the life of women and local communities through efficient use of natural resources with affordable sustainable energy technologies. The project supports 55 women and their vulnerable families in 5 communities. Women and men participated in awareness raising and technical trainings, including exhibitions on sustainable energy solutions, workshops on the construction of solar water heaters and food dryers, trainings on women’s empowerment and a study tour in other villages. In all, 55 efficient cooking stoves, 75 parabolic solar cookers, 40 solar lanterns, 55 pressure cookers and 2 solar water heaters were distributed in the target villages. Additionally, 300 tree seedlings will be planted to regenerate the forest.

Climate impact: Renewables and resource efficient technologies such as solar ovens and water heaters, pressure cookers, or improved stoves significantly reduce firewood consumption (at least by 3 tons/year/family), mitigating CO2 emissions and indoor pollution, and improving comfort and sanitation. The reforestation component will help to reverse climate change impacts in an area that has suffered from an acceleration of desertification due to deforestation.

Gender impact: Little Earth focuses on empowering women as problem solvers and new technology experts and leaders. With extra hours gained during the day, on chores like gathering wood, and in the evenings, thanks to solar lanterns, women can pursue new sources of income such as embroidery or knitting. Children can study and stay in school. With additional income, beneficiaries can diversify and improve family diets, ensuring food security and better nutrition. Women are seen as valuable contributors in the communities, changing social dynamics for the better.

Scalability: Promoting affordable, low-tech and adapted renewable energy technologies to isolated, off-grid communities that are severely impacted by climate change is a model that can be replicated in many similar regions. Little Earth partners with another NGO and with local authorities. They would like to extend this initiative throughout the Bartang Valley and in other mountainous areas of Tajikistan, where patriarchal structures prevent change. Empowering women as problem solvers and leaders in their communities transforms the social dynamics and paves the way for stronger resilience.

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Spotless Dame – combating menstrual hygienic poverty while reducing plastic waste

Description of the project: This project addresses the interconnected challenges of plastic waste, extreme poverty, unhygienic practices during menstruation, and sustainable livelihoods. It enables adolescent girls and community women to lead healthy lives by breaking myths and taboos surrounding menstruation and creating awareness about healthy practices. More than 6,500 Mera Pads -reusable cloth pads made from bamboo- have been distributed. Their production and sales have created new jobs for 25 women, improving the livelihoods of their families. Over 7,500 women and girls have been trained in menstrual hygiene through 92 Workshops in 30 villages across 8 districts of Rajasthan. Awareness raising programs were also organised for boys and men to break the cycle of menstrual discrimination.

Climate impact: Disposable sanitary pads result in the unsustainable discharge of millions of tonnes of plastic waste all over the world, which are nearly non biodegradable. One woman using disposable pads and tampons for menstrual hygiene will generate around 150 kg of plastic waste during her entire life, with an estimated carbon footprint of 900 kg CO2. This project has thus far supported 1,626 women with 6,504 reusable cloth pads, saving 31,219 kg of plastic waste and substantially reducing carbon emissions.

Gender impact: Access to safe menstrual hygiene can be a matter of life and death. Patriarchal discrimination of menstruating women still prevails in India. With affordable, sustainable alternative pads, this project has created jobs, improved the life of 1,626 women and raised the capacity of 7,500 girls and women on menstrual hygiene management. Programs to sensitise boys and men break gender taboos. Pragati Sakhis -environmental ambassadors- are selected to educate and empower women in their communities on environment and health.

Scalability: Started in one village in 2015, Spotless Dame has already been replicated in 30 locations from 8 districts. Pragati Sakhis -environmental ambassadors- endorse the role of multiplicators and ensure up-scaling. The business model based on a sustainable production with local materials and local people is easy to replicate. By 2030, the non-profit organisation aims to provide 1 million women with Mera Pads, creating sustainable jobs for at least 1,000 women.

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Safeguarding Endorois people’s knowledge and ecosystems via an inclusive and autonomous governance protocol

Description of the project: This project supports the discriminated Endorois people around Lake Bogoria to articulate their own priorities and procedures for the conservation of their natural resources by developing a Biocultural Community Protocol (BCP). It documents the ancestral knowledge of Endorois women and men on their ecosystems and provides proactive responses to climate impacts, among other threats. It guides the community on collective engagement with external stakeholders on access, use and management of their endogenous resources, based on the legal framework of the Nagoya Protocol. The elected Endorois Welfare Council, representing all 17 target communities (up to 60 000 people), and respecting gender balance, contributes to the protection of genetic and biological resources, including the neighboring ecosystems due to the transboundary nature of ecological effects.

Climate impact: The BCP ensures the use of Indigenous knowledge to launch initiatives to adapt to climate impacts – droughts, loss of biodiversity, invasive species – and unlock multiple socio-economic benefits. The community has documented their traditional beliefs and indigenous knowledge and thus, the BCP is an intergenerational negotiation tool to address collaboration with external actors and provide solutions that safeguard and complement traditional knowledge for climate resilience and other key environmental issues.

Gender impact: The BCP adopts an inclusive strategy where women were included in leading positions in the governance structures and have become active agents in environmental conservation. Women actively participated in the negotiations and articulation of their rights, culture and traditions for natural resource management. The BCP clearly maps out women’s age-set, with separate representation of female youth and elderly, and recognizes their roles and rights with regards to conservation. Capacity-building also enhanced their understanding of policy, legal and institutional frameworks.

Scalability: The BCP strengthens the community’s capacity to use traditional knowledge to achieve sustainable natural resource management, and it aims to influence other Indigenous communities in similar circumstances, having positive impacts on neighboring territories. Such methodology can be replicated in many endangered ecosystems. The Endorois people are able to protect their rights and knowledge via collective engagement with external stakeholders. As a result, with a more cohesive society, they can avert possible conflict situations among members of the community arising from declining natural resources.

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Sexual and reproductive health and rights as a basis for conservation action

Description of the project: FUNDAECO breaks traditional cultural barriers to ensure the SRH rights of adolescent girls in more than 100 isolated Mayan and Q’echqi communities of Guatemala, as a fundament for their involvement in forest conservation. 22 health clinics, established in Protected Areas of Izabal, have provided regular care and counseling to 50,000 patients (2/3 women), significantly reducing teenage pregnancies, and strengthening women’s leadership. Support provided in maternal and infant feeding, control of malnutrition and hygiene are linked to environmental protection activities, i.e good eating habits using natural resources, or sustainable waste management. A scholarship and youth leadership program contributes to end discrimination of women with formal and informal education.

Climate impact: FUNDAECO integrated SRHR in it’s approach to sustainable community development and conservation efforts of the Caribbean Guatemala Protected Areas. Trainings in managing and processing non-timber forest products are offered within a programme supporting more than 500 families of indigenous communities for the creation of 4,000 hectares of agroforestry systems. It includes planting rubber and fruit trees, black pepper, shade trees, and creating live wind barriers to increase the forest cover in agricultural and livestock systems, regenerating the forest’s biodiversity.

Gender impact: The 22 clinics have become a vehicle for women’s empowerment, and mobilised the communities around family planning issues, violence against women and sexually transmitted diseases. 10 communitarian first aid kits were developed. FUNDAECO worked with the Movement for Equity in Guatemala Association (AME), to develop training processes about human rights, SRHR and gender based violence. Scholarship support for 48 teenage girls enabled 15 of them to graduate and access new study opportunities. Women’s groups initiated new income generating activities contributing to improved livelihoods and enhanced status in their communities.

Scalability: From a pilot started in 2014 with 3 clinics, the project expanded to a network of 22 community-based clinics and 3 mobile ones. The success for up-scaling lies in the ability to integrate health care services, human rights and SRHR education into environmental protection activities and policies, taking into account cultural relevance for the Mayan groups – Q’eqchi, Mam, Chuj, Q’anjobal people. The scholarship program in particular has progressively become a multiplier among communities, with empowered young girls actively promoting new models of development.

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Transforming gender relations and turning to sustainable resource use in the Kilum-Ijim Forests of Cameroon

Description of the project: CAMGEW engages local and ethnic women in sustainable forest management, while enhancing their human and socio-economic rights and transforming patriarchal gender relations in the forest communities. Cooperating with Oku local authorities and the government of Cameroon, CAMGEW gives women the opportunity to assume leadership positions of forest institutions and stakeholder platforms. They provide a broad range of trainings to over 2000 people : environmental education for schools and adults, bee farming, agroforestry and organic farming, small livestock breeding and biogas production, entrepreneurship skills with financial assistance. This initiative helps 800 young women fight domestic violence through counseling on their rights, business opportunities and community sensitization to counter early marriages.

Climate impact: Training in agroforestry for 772 community members, two-thirds women, prevents soil erosion and deforestation, while responding to domestic food and firewood needs. Three plant nurseries provided farms at the forest periphery with 150,000 saplings. Forest education was imparted in schools, through social media, radio, social gatherings, men’s clubs. 240 Mbororo women gained skills on organic farming to improve fodder for their cattle and sheep, reducing farmer-grazer conflicts. 900 bee hives donated to farmers guard health of the forest.

Gender impact: CAMGEW has applied gender mainstreaming across all it’s activities: agroforestry and organic farming with cattle breeding, plant nurseries, beekeeping, business skills trainings for 1580 women, incl dressmaking & hairdressing for 20 girls; giving loans to 1325 of them. Counseling 800 victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse -including teenage mothers and HIV/AIDS infected- on their social rights, and empowering them with business skills and advice on nutrition and health, working on legalization of mariages, CAMGEW transforms the gender relations in patriarchal Mbororo communities.

Scalability: The project is a model of constructive cooperation and knowledge sharing with local and national public authorities and a broad range of stakeholders – research institutes, fondations, NGOs- making it replicable and scalable. Train the trainer scheme with use of local experts, enhances continuous learning and sustainability of this model. There are, for example, exchange visits between honey cooperatives, bee farmers and bee farmer groups. The Honeyshop is a demonstration centre for research, learning and marketing.

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Advocacy for the implementation of the UNFCCC gender action plan (GAP)

Description of the project: This project was implemented in the Oyo, Ogun and Lagos states. It raised awareness and capacity of relevant policy makers, ministries, departments and agencies as well as local women’s organizations on integrating gender equality and women’s empowerment in climate policies. It also advocated for the full and equal participation of women in climate actions. Awareness raising meetings with local women were further used
as a platform to conduct “Talanoa Dialogues”, where they freely shared their stories of climate struggles and offered solutions that can shape global policies to raise ambition in reaching the 1.5 degree temperature limit.

Climate impact: The interactions among heads of climate relevant sectors such as energy, environment and women affairs at the trainings has opened up an avenue for integrated and common agenda approach to addressing climate change issues across the Nigerian states. Civil society organizations are acting as pressure groups in the implementation of the Gender Action Plan using online media to expand their outreach and accelerate the
process.

Gender impact: The importance of mainstreaming gender and women’s equal participation in climate change policies has been recognized in the current review of the Lagos state climate plan. The project has helped to strengthen gender responsive provisions n policy making and in practical implementation through integrating gender into Lagos state climate scenario building workshop, with action being undertaken both on and offline.

Scalability / replicability: The project has attracted subnational level government in Lagos state, with plans to train officers of relevant departments, community development associations and community based women’s groups on gender and climate change, GAP and how it can be implemented in the local governments. This clearly indicates that the project is scalable especially at the subnational and community levels where the impacts of climate change are being felt most.

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Gender-responsive land rights framework for climate action

Description of the project: With increased pressure on land exacerbated by climate instability, women’s secure land rights can be an accelerator for achieving the goals of multiple global agendas. The Strengthening Gender-Responsive Land Rights project aims to increase the capacity of civil society and policymakers to integrate gender and land tenure perspectives into their programmatic, policy and advocacy work and create linkages across the relevant climate frameworks to strengthen global norms on women’s land rights that can influence national and local
policies and programs.

Climate impact: Studies have demonstrated the potential for gender-responsive tenure security to enhance the likelihood of women, men and communities to invest in and make use of land in ways that strengthen adaptive capacity and help mitigate climate change. Strengthening women’s land rights, as well as the rights of men and communities, is also imperative for disaster risk management and the overall management of climate-induced
migration and displacement.

Gender impact: Since 2015, Landesa has conducted analyses, awareness and advocacy programs for integration of genderresponsive land rights frameworks into climate discourse and commitments. UNCCD COP13 agreed to mainstream gender dimensions into efforts to stop land degradation and develop a gender plan of action – critical gains for progress in the work of UNCCD. Similarly, national reviews increased recognition that giving women access to land tenure improves SDG 15 – life on land – related actions.

Scalability / replicability: When gender-responsive land rights frameworks are integrated and adapted into climate change agendas, it influences policies at scale where subsequent shifts at the national and sub-national levels can support hundreds of millions of people. Gender-equal land rights and clear tenure security have the potential to decrease poverty and food insecurity; empower women and decrease gender inequality; and enhance sustainable land management and sustainable communities and cities.

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Participation is power: women demand gender-just climate finance

Description of the project: Co-led by WEDO and Both ENDS, this initiative strives to build capacity and knowledge to track, monitor and influence the projects and financial flows of the Green Climate Fund (GCF). With the hope of mobilizing resources and support, the initiative is funding the direct participation of feminist and women’s rights activists in the work of the GCF, supporting regional feedback channels, working with women’s funds on strategies for direct access, and hosting a webinar series to take a deep dive into important aspects of the climate financing architecture. We aim to ensure that money reaches local women’s groups and that projects are designed to respond to the needs of communities.

Climate impact: The GCF, part of the UNFCCC’s financial mechanism, was created to provide funds for developing countries to mitigate and adapt to climate change, with 50% of the funds to be distributed in support of adaptation. It aims to promote a shift to low-emission and climate-resilient development. With an initial resource mobilization of over $10 billion, the GCF has an undeniable ability to shape action. A key aim of this initiative is to orient the flow of GCF funds toward gender-just climate solutions.

Gender impact: This project has supported women activists as regional monitors. They attended the 19th, 20th, and 21st GCF Board meetings and created regional coordination groups for those interested in gender and the GCF to come together to discuss and review proposals’ gendered impacts and gender action plans, among other activities. Five webinars on women’s rights and climate finance attracted over 250 attendees, and over 800 later viewings. Both ENDS is supporting the accreditation of a women’s fund.

Scalability / replicability: This initiative can be scaled up across its multiple activities. Improving civil society’s capacity is vital to effective monitoring and/or influence, and the regional gender groups could be further coordinated through capacity-building and strategic planning meetings, translation services, and organizational
support. With additional funding, regular, translated, topic-specific webinars can be designed and delivered, and more women’s funds supported in navigating the accreditation process.

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Not without us! Climate and gender justice in international climate politics

Description of the project: “Not without us” was launched in 2017 to promote the integration of gender justice in international climate policies and within the global climate justice movement. The aim is to support selected activists and gender experts from environmental groups and women’s organizations from Ecuador, South Africa and   Indonesia in their attempts to connect local struggles for climate and gender justice with the UNFCCC process,
enabling networking with other actors. As ‘multipliers’ they will also be able to translate the international climate discourse back into their own organizations and local contexts.

Climate impact: National and international climate policies have proven to be more effective when gender is taken into account. In their respective communities, the participants are dedicated to different topics such as forest, agriculture, etc. On the international level, they have identified the corresponding focal topics where their local issues are negotiated. By participating in events and discussions, the women advocate for gender just climate solutions and showcase local examples of best practice.

Gender impact: Selected female activists are empowered to advocate for gender justice in their local contexts, as well as in national and international spheres. Additionally, the project aims
at identifying the impacts of international climate policies on gender relations at local level. It addresses the lack of data on gender and climate change. Local stakeholder workshops, networking and exchange within and among organisations have increased awareness and knowledge about gender, climate change and UNFCCC.

Scalability / replicability: The project can increase outreach to a wider range of stakeholders within the target countries and their communities, thus, potentializing inter-organisational learning. It can also be scaled up to cover more participants from other countries. Both developing and developed countries should be taken into account, as skill-sharing within the global South and between global South and global North is a co-benefit. Webinars and trainings can be replicated globally.

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Women solar engineers crossing fronteers to spread clean, affordable energy solutions in rural communities

Description of the project: This South-South cooperation between grassroots communities of India and Cameroon builds women’s capacities as solar engineers that provide energy solutions adapted to local needs around agriculture, household electrification and education. Thanks to the Barefoot College in India, 20 women in the Fako district of Cameroon have been trained to install solar panels, lamps, dryers and mills, benefitting 400 families. As educators and engineers of sustainable solutions, rural women are effectively empowered in their community and
within a worldwide pioneering movement.

Climate impact: Replacing fossil fuel and firewood with decentralized solar energy in rural households and villages bears an immense potential for climate mitigation, income generation and social welfare in the global South. 250 kerosene lanterns, each emitting approximately 200kg of CO2/year, were replaced by solar lamps, reducing 50 t. CO2. Further solar energy solutions installed in 400 households saved another 80 t. CO2. Such local
impact can be scaled up nationally.

Gender impact: This project tackles gender inequality in the rural South via solidarity-based intercultural exchange. 4 grassroot “grandmas”, trained by the Barefoot College in India to become solar energy experts and agents of change, have trained 20 rural women in Cameroon to spread clean energy solutions in their communities. All have enhanced their right to access vocational education and equal opportunities; they have improved their social status and decision making power at the community level.

Scalability / replicability: Barefoot College is a long established grassroot movement that has disseminated an exemplary model of local appropriation and successful replication in over 70 countries. Building on this South-South cooperation, the Rural Women Development Center aims to scale-up this program by building a rural training center and doubling the number of beneficiaries.

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Restoring biodiversity in community forest by planting caterpillar trees

Description of the project: The Batwa Pygmies are discriminated against in DRC, particularly in their access to traditional forests, often overexploited. This project aims at restoring forest ownership by Pygmy populations (1,600 beneficiaries) and biodiversity in the Equator province by planting trees that host edible caterpillars in two forest areas of 100 ha each. Caterpillars used as food produce can mitigate food insecurity due to the loss of crops and generate a source of income for indigenous women. They are trained to rehabilitate damaged ecosystems and manage forests rationally and sustainably.

Climate impact: The Batwas’s community forests suffer from increasing deforestation due to industrial overexploitation and soil impoverishment through unsustainable agricultural practices. The project aims at fighting deforestation by rehabilitating local plants: planting trees that host edible caterpillars allows for successful restoration of the forest biodiversity. The project aims at a total annual production of 25,000 tons of caterpillars which could yield an annual income of up to $3,750,000.

Gender impact: The project is led by FECOFFA, an indigenous women’s organization, ensuring them total integration in the decisional process. Furthermore, FECOFFA trains indigenous families – women and girls primarily – to plant trees that host edible caterpillars, reinforcing their knowledge competencies. The income generated by the project also aims at improving the autonomy of the Batwa women involved.

Scalability / replicability: The project aims to limit discriminations suffered by the Batwas in the decisional processes related to forest exploitation in Congo and, in a broader scope, to reinforce the respect of specific indigenous peoples rights in policies linked to REDD+. The project was implemented in 4 villages: Bowele, Bolama, Bokenge and Boala Ngombe. Its economic model is simple and replicable.

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