Ancestral know-how and innovative technologies help women producers of salt and rice preserve the mangroves

Description of the project: The DEDURAM project aims to improve the livelihoods of women and communities in the mangroves of Guinea-Bissau, through sustainable management of space, energy and natural resources. North-South knowledge exchange and capacity-building of women producers contribute to structure and develop the salt and rice value chain in the mangroves. 2000 family farms, 75% of which are managed by women, have adopted sustainable production methods (solar energy, reduced water consumption), thanks to the sharing of ancestral know-how and innovative techniques. 1500 women and 500 men have gained in autonomy through increased revenues and their integration into the local economy, while adapting to the impacts of climate change.

Climate impact: The traditional salt production technique – by heating brine – uses 3 tons of firewood for each ton of salt. By introducing the ancestral solar method used in the salt marshes of Brittany, Universsel has enabled women in Guinea to produce 4000 t. of salt while protecting 24 ha. of mangrove forests. Efficient water management in rice-growing areas has favoured the rehabilitation of abandoned rice paddies while increasing rice yield. This innovation, combined with geo-referenced monitoring, helps to preserve the biodiversity of a fragile ecosystem, and prevents further deforestation of the mangrove.

Genderimpact: Salt is exclusively produced by women in Guinea-Bissau. 1500 of them have gained skills in a new solar technique, but also in sales, financial management, microcredit and the structuring into cooperatives. They enjoy better living and working conditions and greater recognition within a patriarchal society. They have become actively involved in the protection of their ecosystem as their cultural horizons have been broadened through exchange visits to France and Senegal, and they have been empowered within organized associations of women salt producers.

Scalability / replicability: DEDURAM promotes two innovative techniques which are affordable and easy to adopt by women producers in Guinea Conakry, Guinea Bissau and soon in Senegal. The beneficiaries cooperate with local professional organisations and Government agencies. In order to ensure the sustainability and scaling up of the adopted technologies, rice areas management committees and women producers associations have worked together to draw up a capacity-building plan including the preservation of the mangrove and climate resilience measures.

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Inclusive, sustainable waste management in Delhi

Description of the project
The inhabitants and entreprises of Delhi are generating excessive waste and civic authorities have no systematic sustainable waste management in place. A survey conducted in BudhVihar, a colony located in southwest Delhi, reflected that the locality has improper waste & drainage system, water logging, health issues and each household on an average generates around 1 kg of kitchen waste everyday. To address this challenge, AIWC is training women from the locality in waste separation and home based compost system. They produce manure in a cycle of 45 days with ‘Khamba”, with a set of 3 earthen pots kept on top of each other. Layer of waste and cocopeat is filled in the pots on rotation and after decay, the waste turns into organic manure.

Climate impact
Dumping of waste in landfill or burning it releases carbon dioxide and pollutes the environment. According to the Press Information Bureau, India generates 62 million tonnes of mixed waste containing both recyclable and non-recyclable every year, with an average annual growth rate of 4% (PIB 2016). This project aims to mitigate GHG emission at micro level, sensitize the targeted household and support a sustainable waste management system at source.

Gender impact
The women from the Delhi suburb community were informed on various issues relating to waste, including health hazards. They were also trained to package and sell the manure to other households and local markets, either as manure or with sapling planted in a small pot. The project raises women’s technical skills and knowledge, and their capacities in generating income activities, as well as implementing preventive health measures.

Scalability
The project is cost effective and replicable at household level, as well as in other similar communities. It can also be scaled up to a community based waste management system, using the business model of compost pits and lead to a proper waste management system within the area.

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Rural woman in Yucatan committed to healthy harvests and smoke-free cooking

Project Desciption: In rural areas of Yucatán, the main economic activity is agriculture, a sector where women account for 70% of the workforce. They perform their daily work without any basic training, technology, financing and without the rights over the land they cultivate. Climate change has made this problem even worse, making it more difficult to break the cycle of poverty. The goal of this project is to empower women by giving them access to natural resources in their homes through biodigesters, developing skills that improve their farming practices and reduce the risks of respiratory diseases and the time needed for gathering firewood, protecting the forests and stopping the use of chemical fertilisers. For this, 599 biodigesters have been installed in Yucatán’s indigenous communities.

Climate Impact: In 5 years, 432,897 m3 of biogas have been produced, reducing the use of firewood by 88%. Experience showed that manure transformed into energy eliminates a significant amount of CO2. The biodigesters have reduced 7,892 metric tons of animal waste that would have ended up in the aquifer. They produce 37 million litres of biofertiliser a year, for a fertilisation potential of approximately 567 ha/year, the equivalent of replacing 170,000 kg of synthetic fertilisers a year. This figure implies that the use of biofertiliser replaces the use of chemical fertilisers, as well as pesticides.

Gender Impact: Biodigesters, mainly managed by women, provide self-produced inputs that improve harvests and nutrition, breaking the cycle of extreme poverty and malnutrition in a period of climate change. Women participated in trainings and their voices were integrated into the generation of knowledge on climate change, rights and the use of clean energy. The systems adopted reduce the women’s health risks and financial stress and have an impact on energy and food safety, as well as on the diversification of productive farming activities.

Scalibility: The biodigesters can be replicated and are designed for small producers. They are mainly supplied with animal waste and require very little maintenance, helping the women and girls to save time to engage in other activities. The aim is to replicate knowledge through the creation of the first storage and treatment centre, called U ́Ka Muuk’ Lu’um, since 2017. The consolidation of this centre provides knowledge and space for these producers to find the tools for reproducing sustainable agricultural practices.

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Women cooperatives of Ireli fight desertification in Mali

Description of the Project: This project, initiated in Mali by ADESAF and co-constructed with the local population, contributes to the fight against the silting up of arable land in an area threatened by desertification. This initiative guarantees access to land for 276 women farmers who have received arable land plots, and been trained in agro-ecological techniques. It has contributed to the creation of cooperatives that generate new income, while ensuring greater food security and climate resilience for the 4,280 inhabitants of Ireli village. The cooperatives and all project activities improve women’s participation in local, resilient development through capacity building and empowerment.

Climate Impact: Ireli is located more than 100 km from the Niger River, in an arid area. The Village Development Committee succeeded in setting 10 hectares of dunes by forming 4 dedicated teams of women and men. 80 people were trained in planting and conserving local plants fixing the dune, and 276 in agroecology, preserving water and the ecosystem, to maximize nature’s regenerative capacities. 2 hectares of vegetable plots are cultivated according to these methods, ensuring the population’s resilience to climate impacts.

Gender Impact: The 276 women farmers have formed 8 groups that benefit from arable plots and training in arboriculture and agro-ecological gardening, as well as marketing, accounting skills and cooperative management. A part of the sales of the cooperative’s production is reinvested, while the rest improves the farmers’ incomes. Training courses strengthen women’s participation and role in decision-making instances. They elect their own presidents and managers independently. Their legitimacy is recognized by all villagers.

Scalibility: The collaboration with a local association and the support of the Sangha Town Hall ensure a good territorial anchoring. An appropriate economic model and good governance strengthens the autonomy of the inhabitants in managing the actions. Capitalization work was carried out through interviews and studies. The women also benefited from the experience of Tireli’s women farmers, who conducted a similar program. The community intends to scale-up by involving unemployed youth in Sangha and improving the incomes of cooperatives.

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Game changing rice culture empowers rural women to ensure food security in South Odisha

Description of the project: Pragati Koraput works with over 8000 ethnic women farmers in Koraput District, India, to ensure climate resilient nutritional food security. Activities include training on water saving System of Rice Intensification (SRI) for rice and millets, organic crop diversification with access to indigenous stress tolerant seeds, farm mechanization, and organized collectives for market access. The project has enhanced women’s position as change agents in the family and community. It has also increased the communities’ understanding of climate impacts on agriculture and the importance of proper conservation and use of resources for climate resilience.

Climate impact: System of Rice Intensification (SRI) creates aerobic soil conditions through shallow and intermittent irrigation, which contributes to better crop yield and food security, drop in production costs, and reduced freshwater consumption (-40%). This remarkable water management system in rice paddies, as well as reduced use of chemical fertilizer have resulted in substantial methane reduction, with significant mitigation and adaptation impact.

Gender impact: Thanks to the training and mentoring activities, confidence and self-esteem have risen in the mind of 8,200 women beneficiaries from 315 villages. The initiative has created space for the women to participate in local, state and national forums. They take leadership roles in communities to discuss and act on climate issues impacting their lives. They motivate peers to adopt innovative technologies for resilient agriculture. Men in the villages acknowledge their significant contribution, which is transforming the gendered power relations.

Scalability: SRI has the potential to involve many more farmers across the region as it is a methodology with proven results. Replicating SRI organic practices can have far-reaching positive impacts on a large scale, such as increase in food production, releasing the financial burden on farmers and promoting a more sustainable economy, with improved nutritional food security. Applying the principles of SRI in other crops and crop diversification will revive biodiversity and protect soil and water quality.

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Light Every Birth: solar suitcases for maternal health care

Description of the project: We Care Solar addresses global maternal-newborn health by providing reliable and renewable electricity to power the lighting, communication, and medical devices essential for obstetric care. Around the world, clinicians struggle in near-darkness to provide lifesaving care in facilities lacking electricity. The “Light Every Birth” initiative has brought solar suitcases to public health facilities throughout five African countries, equipping over 4,000 maternal health centers. The 12-volt DC solar electric system includes medical lights, headlamps, a fetal heart-rate monitor and installation hardware. This initiative facilitates timely, quality care for women and newborns in last-mile health centers; it is a model for gender-sensitive energy transition.

Climate impact: We Care Solar suitcases replace fossil fuel sources of lighting, such as candles,
kerosene lanterns, oil wick lamps, and diesel fuel generators, reducing carbon
dioxide formation, improving air quality, and removing the risk of fire. After deploying more than 4,000 solar suitcases in partnership with NGOs and UN agencies, about 40,000 tons of CO2 emissions could be reduced. By providing solar energy, the initiative is making rural health centers a model of renewable energy for communities.

Gender impact:
Foremost, the initiative improves life chances for women and newborns in regions with persistently high maternal and neonatal mortality rates and low rates of energy access.
Due to the lack of female solar installers, a “Women Solar Ambassador” program was launched to develop training materials showcasing women as installers and to promote women trainers for capacity-building on solar installation and maintenance. An educational program encourages more girls to enter STEM fields.

Scalability: The solar suitcases as well as educational and capacity-building programs can be rolled-out in more areas. A best practice guide for scale-up has been developed in this regard. A replicable model includes sharing decision-making with local agencies, creating steering committees with key stakeholders, training local technicians and healthcare workers in solar maintenance, providing ongoing technical support, and ensuring eventual handover of the programs into local and national governments.

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Empowered women ensure community-based forest preservation

Description of the project: Three organizations in the central districts of Nepal -Kathmandu, Makwanpur, and Sarlah- are promoting aromatic herb plantation and essential oil production, ecotourism, and handicraft development in 13 community forests over 1,375 hectares. More than 4000 households benefit from the project, contributing to surveying the trees, revising forest management plans, and establishing plant nurseries in conjunction with economic activities. Community based ecotourism policies were strengthened, and three women-led forestry enterprises were successfully registered and operated, producing market-recognized forest products to improve local livelihoods.

Climate impact: These nepalese districts suffer from deforestation due to rapid population growth, overuse of fuelwood, and clear felling under electric lines. Participatory development of new plans demonstrating sustainable forest management (SFM) practices, alongside capacity-building through SFM training, effectively counters the deforestation. Nurseries have supported the planting of 175,000 trees, and the distribution of improved cookstoves, including biogas units, reduces future fuelwood demand. Ecotourism policy-strengthening has also provided a foundation for SFM to continue.

Gender impact: 551 women have directly benefited from trainings, economic opportunities, and received appliances. Basic and advanced handicraft training led to two profitable enterprises. Along with an aromatic herb plantation, these enterprises are generating income and giving women greater autonomy over their daily spending. SFM training has supported the equal involvement of women in community forest monitoring and management. The additional distribution of solar panels for lighting and improved cookstoves has enabled more time flexibility, reduced fuel-gathering labor, and improved health.

Scalability: This work is able to be replicated to support women’s economic upliftment in Nepal. The plantation of aromatic herbs is particularly identified as a model for replication. The Government of Nepal’s emphasis on eco-tourism promotion, forest based enterprises and SFM will contribute to the sustainability and scalability of this approach. To reach policy makers and other audiences in Nepal, a wide range of communication tools were employed, including local media coverage, brochures and documentary filmmaking.

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Fostering rural women’s entrepreneurship with solar energy solutions

Description of the project: India produces large quantities of fruits and vegetables, but more than 50% of this is wasted. The project aims to: 1) demonstrate the commercial viability of solar drying of fruits, vegetables and condiments, and convert them into profitable products on a micro enterprise scale; 2) equip rural poor women with solar dryers and train them on proper use. Sthree Sakthi Mahila Samajam installed solar powered air dryers in 2017
under the Socio-Economic Program of AIWC. The technology of dehydration gave several benefits such as minimizing food waste and facilitating higher income to rural women. Cereal grains, vegetables, fruits, etc., can be dried in solar dryers under clean conditions in reasonably short time.

Climate impact: Using solar energy has a direct mitigation benefit and reduces dependence on fossil or bio fuels. With one solar dryer, about 1 t. of liquid and 2.6 t. of semi-liquid raw materials can be dehydrated annually to produce mango bars, fruit candy, etc. This saves 1.2 t. of firewood per year. Additionally, it reduces rotting of fresh fruits, minimizing methane emissions by approximately 20 kg/ton. About 5-6 t. of material can be composted,
sequestering 1 t. CO2 more.

Gender impact: In the present project, a self-help group of 12 women operate two dryers in rotation. At any point, four women work on one dryer. Women trained in solar drying prepare hygienic value-added products from local produce. Economic gains include income of Rs.500-800 or Rs.1800-2000 per month (depending on the season and product). Other gender-gains or advantages are reduced work time (2 hours per day), and more time for household work and for other income generating activities.

Scalability / replicability: In 2005-2007, AIWC trained 50 women to start solar drying as an entrepreneurship, and a
manual for Solar Food Processing was developed. As a follow up, AIWC introduced a scheme where branches could access assistance under a socio-economic project with one dryer given as grant and a soft loan given to the branch for a second dryer. With two dryers, trained women could start income generating activities by selling the solar dried products on the local market.

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Circular economy and women’s entrepreneurship in Burkina Faso

Description of the project: The project supports 100 microsmall and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs), with a focus on feminized sectors, to adopt sustainable production and management methods. Technical support is provided on resource efficiency and clean production (ERPP), industrial symbiosis (IS [1]), and energy auditing. Economic and environmental benefits have been evaluated. The impact for at least 80 MSMEs includes saving energy and primary materials, conserving natural resources, reducing/ eliminating polluting waste and diversifying and creating jobs. National and regional platforms are put in place for scaling up.

Climate impact: By reducing the use of natural or extractive raw materials (oil, gas, coal) and the downstream production of polluting and emitting waste (CO2, methane), ERPP and the IS methodologies contribute directly to climate mitigation, while promoting transition to a circular economy: more efficient production but also the recovery of waste produced within a virtuous circle. A first evaluation including 30 target entreprises shows that 12,000 t. of CO2 have been saved, 500 t. of waste recycled, and 63 t. of virgin materials have not been extracted.

Gender impact: Targeting specific sectors and voluntarily promoting equal opportunities in apprenticeship allowed the strong participation of women entrepreneurs (45%). Alternative manufacturing processes also aim to reduce the drudgery of tasks and improve safety and security, especially within hazardous or polluting operations often delegated to women. Examples: the HAFFAAC oil mill replaces wood combustion with cashew hulls from ANATRANS (pyrolysis system); PTMSA exchanges its maize leaves and stems for manure from Atelier EC, a non-polluting and
safe fertilizer.

Scalability / replicability: Scaling-up and replication are based on recognized ERPP and IS methodologies used in international cooperation. The national platform created and led by WEP has launched green business clubs in Ouagadougou and Bobo Dioulasso. A white paper on IS is being developed to promote a conducive policy framework and national regulations, e.g., to facilitate the safe transport of waste, or raise awareness. The ambition
is to popularize the approach for all businesses in Burkina Faso.

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Integrated solar power rural development in Barbujat

Description of the project: This project aims to empower over 6,800 rural women by improving their access to solar energy for home and production uses. The solar lighting systems, solar cookers, grinders, refrigerators and mobile charging sockets enable women-owned businesses to significantly raise their income. The units are installed and maintained by locally trained beneficiaries, i.e., 29 women and 17 men; the sustainability of the services is ensured by a network of suppliers. A community revolving fund and 8 women-led saving groups allow very low-income persons to access the new technologies and maintenance costs to be covered. A training center ensures equal access to capacity building and learning tools.

Climate impact: Using clean, safe solar energy instead of high emitting kerosene, diesel or biomass reduces the adverse impacts on climate and health. In year one, 100 solar lanterns were installed, saving about 49 tons of CO2. Their scaling up is expected to save another 99 tons of CO2 by 2019. Introducing solar mills to replace old diesel ones will reduce about 3 tons of CO2 emissions per year. In Darfur, where the sunshines over 12h/ day, solar energy brings a high potential for social and sustainable welfare.

Gender impact: The new technologies reduce burdens and hazards faced by women and girls (e.g., indoor air pollution, fire hazards, gender based violence). Time saved is used to engage in income generation and community activities, or attending school or adult classes with an environment enhanced by solar lighting. Targeted technical and management trainings, conducted in the established center, foster women’s entrepreneurship and
their collaboration in groups and committees.

Scalability / replicability: The implementation of the project, along with the established revolving fund, will be handed over to the Rural El-Fashir Development and North Darfur Women CBO network to ensure sustainability. Linkages have been developed between private sector solar companies, government, financial institutions, other relevant stakeholders, and service providers through a participatory market development system. This will facilitate future continuity and scaling-up of the solar energy service and promote policies for its sustainability.

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SISAM: strengthening women’s access to Improved Solar Irrigation Systems in West Africa

Description of the project: SISAM project is an innovative solar irrigation solution (local, sector, affordable, renewable, adapted to the constraints of family farming) that meets the needs of 100 market garden farms, mostly managed by women who have little access to water. A local production line and distribution of pumps, known as “minivolanta”, have been built, as well as access to local microfinance (micro leasing). Activities include production, financing, distribution, maintenance of pumps and irrigation installations. The project contributes to the increased income of market gardeners, as well as freeing up time.

Climate impact: The development of local solar pumping solutions ensures a 100% renewable response to addressing water needs. The project allows market gardeners to ensure production in the dry season and provides training in good water management practices aimed at combating further drying-up and degradation of arid zones. By mitigating the carbon impact through technology that limits CO2 emissions from fossil fuels and international transport, and enabling adaptation and food self-sufficiency, the project aims to have a concrete impact on
climate change.

Gender impact: Women’s involvement is ensured at all stages of the project by taking into account gender specificities, setting up separate meetings and childcare, and dedicated trainings, and enabling participation in management. The priority targets are the farms managed by women. Although women make up the majority of market gardeners in sub-Saharan Africa, their access to resources and funding is limited. Gender impacts
include improving women’s incomes, building their capacity, easing their workload, and empowering them.
Scalability / replicability: SISAM plans to reinforce and disseminate this action beyond the first 100 beneficiary farms.
Regional and national authorities are involved in the consultation process leading to the signing of conventions. An impact assessment and capitalization process is planned in order to determine the modalities for upscaling. An information campaign on the effectiveness of SISAM solutions for food security and irrigation improvements, the development of the local economy, and a better quality of life for workers and households will be conducted.

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E-FAITOU: accelerating the energy transition by providing solar mobile services to women farmers

Description of the project: E-FAITOU facilitates access to solar energy for women farmers in Senegal through an innovative and inclusive concept of mobile multi-service trucks offering rental of solar equipment and post-harvest processing equipment (dryers, mills, refrigerators), charging stations, and digital platforms. Women farmers’ chores are alleviated through mechanized processing of their harvest, facilitated access to market information and education. They can increase productivity thanks to productive solar equipment and access new income generating
activities through direct access to online services. This original pilot project, started in Senegal, is expected to develop across all of West Africa.

Climate impact: Solar technologies are well developed and increasingly affordable. Because of their strong potential for climate mitigation and economic development (Rural Electrification Alliance report), they should be widely disseminated. The amount of kW and CO2 mitigated through use of the productive solar stations and electricity production (solar generator on the trailer) is estimated at more than 3000 tons over 5 years.

Gender impact: Supported by 4 French-Senegalese women entrepreneurs who put the empowerment of rural women at the heart of their vision, this project significantly alleviates the burden of women’s agricultural work while increasing their productivity and opening up new opportunities for creative income generation. Access to online services strengthens financial inclusion and access to information and education, thus empowering micro-entrepreneurs and strengthening the rural economy.

Scalability / replicability: E-FAITOU works in close collaboration with local agencies supporting the beneficiaries -be it groups or micro-entrepreneurs- to identify their needs in planning the route of the service vehicle fleet. After phase 2, covering the rural areas of Senegal, E-FAITOU plans to expand to Benin during phase 3, thanks to a strong entrepreneurial economic model that was awarded by the CTCN / ECOWAS and PFAN.

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Women processing fish on the path to a circular economy at Guet Ndar, Saint-Louis of Senegal

Description of the project: In Saint-Louis, Senegal, fish smoking, a women’s activity, still uses expensive, high-emitting and polluting sources of energy. This pilot project proposes a sustainable, economical and ecological energy solution for a Group of Collective Interest (GIE) consisting of 700 women fish-processors. By recovering waste from their activities through composting units (organic fertilizer) and methanization, this innovative technology brings sustainable ecological and economic benefits to a highly feminized and low value-added business
sector.

Climate impact: Saint-Louis is threatened by rising waters. It is crucial to mitigate climate impacts in this region.
The installation of 6 biodigestors feeding 10 cooking platforms can neutralize 12 t. of methane and 252 t. of CO2 per year. Also, wood fuel savings and the composting of halieutic by-products into organic fertilizer greatly reduces the climate footprint of this process. A wide expansion of the process is planned throughout Saint-Louis, within the framework of the National Biogas Program.

Gender impact: The project takes a gender approach from design to implementation to evaluation. The benefits are
multiple: hard work (collection of wood) is considerably reduced, as well as the negative health impact of wood burning; the cost of energy decreases and the production of digestate (sold as fertilizer) creates added value; and revenues from product processing are significantly improved. In total, the project empowers
700 women workers thr ugh decent income generation and sustainable development.

Scalability / replicability: The involvement of beneficiaries in the construction and management of methanization through an autonomous management structure ensures ownership of the project and its sustainability. The economic model is viable through the sales of excessive biogas and compost, which allows long-term maintenance of the facilities. This pilot, which involved local authorities, was designed to promote the transferability of technical knowledge and the replicability of the intervention method.

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Social enterprise empowers women refugees to master efficient cooking and solar technologies

Description of the project: SAFEnergy Enterprises Uganda, a social enterprise, empowers refugee and HIV positive women with technical skills on energy efficient cooking technologies and entrepreneurship. 47 group leaders in refugee settlements have been trained to construct rocket lorena and shielded cooking stoves and to create their own small businesses. They have transferred their knowledge to 500 more women in the Arua camp and Karamoja host community. The 47 women led registered enterprises also market certified solar lamps to ensure sustainable income. Acquired leadership and managerial skills, as well financial autonomy, help resolve household conflicts over resources, improve women’s roles in decision making and reduce domestic violence.

Climate impact: Rocket Lorena stoves reduce fuel-wood consumption by 50-70%. Solar lamps and solar home systems replace diesel or kerosene. This saves CO2 emissions and prevents deforestation. Up to 1200 ha could be protected in the target areas. The technologies also reduce indoor pollution by 98%, an important health benefit for targeted local nurseries and schools. Construction is done with locally sourced materials that have a lower climate footprint and lower costs.

Gender impact: This project promotes gender equality and women’s rights through economic empowerment. Additional and stabilised income enables women to access health care services, immediate family needs and sometimes land property. Trainings integrate modules on rights and leadership. This results in women demanding more equitable resource sharing in the household and community and gives them the ability to resolve conflicts peacefully and avoid gender-based violence.

Scalability / replicability: This project is based on the use of widely spread, certified low-tech solutions that are easily replicable and can be applied anywhere with locally available materials. The entrepreneurship model is made accessible to very poor rural women as it does not require capital and ensures regular income from the sales of affordable, cost saving energy solutions. The women leaders groups ensure scalabilty and sustainability.

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Bhungroo – small women farmers owning and developing an innovative rainwater saving technology

Description of the project: Erratic rain and irrigation scarcity contribute to food insecurity, financial losses and indebtedness for small farmers in India, especially in coastal areas. Bhungroo®, a locally developed rainwater management technology, saves farmers’ crops from waterlogging during monsoons and ensures adequate irrigation during dry seasons. The project relies on trained rural Women Climate Leaders (WCLs), who promote the technology and deliver fee-based agriculture expert advice. The co-ownership model has facilitated access to irrigation and farming facilities to smallholders, with each one ensuring food-security to 30-100 rural poor, and generating income of approximately USD $5700+ per year.

Climate impact: Gujarat State, India is prone to heavy flooding during monsoon and severe droughts the rest of year. Rainwater harvesting system Bhungroo®, supported by WCL services, brings back two harvests a year in areas that had become wastelands. The technology protects groundwater via a filtration system and increases soil fertility by reducing salinity, warding off desertification. With 30-year life-span, each unit conserves 1- 4 million liters of runoff water and saves 5-10 acres from water logging during wet seasons, while irrigates 22+ acres each winter.

Gender impact: Women form their own ownership groups, learning how to construct, install, and maintain Bhungroos and provide these services to other farmers. They adapt to climate change by being able to collect, store and distribute irrigation water as needed. This enables them to increase their revenue threefold. Becoming nutritionally and financially self-sufficient improves women farmers’ social status and helps them obtain formal land ownership, participate in village governance, and invest in the education of their children, including girls.

Scalability / replicability: Since 2011, over 3500 units of Bhungroo® have been constructed in 7 provinces of India as part of India’s rural development policy, but also in Bangladesh, Vietnam and Ghana. Replicability is ensured by the local sourcing of materials and the end users’ personal involvement in construction and maintenance. Expansion and up-scaling is based on the WCL model, where these first beneficiaries and users of Bhungroo have been trained and are now passing on their technical knowledge and understanding of climate adaptation.

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Women building and using clean cook stoves and planting a Great Green Wall on over 1500 km

Description of the project: 

Nigeria’s Great Green Wall Project aims to address the negative social, economic and environmental impacts of land degradation and desertification in Northern Nigeria. Over 110 women in 11 states (Adamawa, Sokoto, Katsina, Gombe, Kano, Borno, Yobe, Kebbi, Bauchi, Jigawa and Zamfara) have been trained on constructing 1500 energy efficient cook stoves from local materials to reduce the burning of biomass and the degradation of vegetation. Women’s capacities are also built on creating alternative sources of income, so as to raise their economic autonomy.

Climate Impact: The use of energy efficient cook stoves reduces fuel wood consumption – and CO2 emissions – of households by 80%, thus significantly reducing deforestation. This project additionally foresees the replantation by the governement of different species of trees on a territory – the “Great Green Wall“ – that will be about 1,500 km long (East-West) and 2 km wide (North-South), in the 11 states faced with the highest desertification rate in Nigeria.

Gender Impact: Women are crucial for adopting green technologies for their household and spreading good practices within their communities. This initiative empowered them with important new technical skills, and new leadership roles in their villages, as they actively contribute to mitigating climate change and fighting desertification. The project significantly reduces women’s unpaid labor burden, creating opportunities for revenue generating activities. Finally, it improves their health by reducing indoor air pollution.

Scalability /replicability: WEP has developped a technical training module that can be easily replicated. Using local materials also ensures an affordable upscaling of the program. WEO intends to extended this concept in the coming years to the Middle Belt and South Nigeria, where climate change is severely impacting the livelihood of people, especially women, who often risk their lives when going long distances to get fuel wood. The program could be expanded to many other similar regions in Africa and to other continents.

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Economic empowerment of rural women with solar energy and micro-enterpreneurship

Description of the project: This green energy project aims to demonstrate the economic sustainability and gender impact of selling solar dried fruits, vegetables, and condiments. The micro-enterprise, created and managed by 5 women, uses 2 solar dryers (capacity of 50 kg each) to process and transform local seasonal fruits and vegetables into packaged food products with strong value added. They work with 43 women suppliers, who receive important additional revenues and reduce product wasting. The organization trains women’s groups in solar drying processes and marketing skills.

Climate Impact: Using solar dryers reduces the dependence on fossil fuel and saves 1.2 t. firewood /year. 3,6 t. raw fruits, vegetables and spices are dehydrated annually to produce fruit bars, pepper, arrow root powder, tamarind, chips and wafers. Reducing the rotting of raw fruits (about 3 t. jackfruit, guava, mango) also minimizes CH4 emissions. About 5-6 t. of compost used for kitchen gardens, sequestering 1 t. CO2. Climate change awareness and knowledge has been increased among households and women’s groups.

Gender Impact: Women are empowered through local production and selling of high value-add food products. Revenue increase for women employees and suppliers (from10$ to 30$ /month depending on the season and product). Reduced labour burden (2 hrs/day), creating time for other income generating activities. Participation in purchasing and processing decisions, marketing, and profits sharing. The micro-enterprise participates in fairs and festivals to share knowledge, offer training support.

Scalability /replicability: Started with 1 solar dryer in 2005. Has since expanded to a micro-enterprise in 2009 with one more dryer, more equipment and technical training. Today more than 400 women have been trained in solar drying process and entrepreneurship skills. The micro-entreprise format can be replicated, as well as the distribution structure: retail outlets, schools, local markets.

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Otro Tiempo Otro Planeta (Other Time Other Planet)

 

Description of the project: This project develops a locally organized safe waste disposal system for used cooking oil, transformed in biodiesel. It creates employment for women who have been victims of gender violence, and contributes to the reduction of water pollution and CO2 emissions. Otro Tiempo’s objective is to empower women economically and socially. In 2015, the association had 130 clients, and 3 full time women employees. It forecasts to increase the volume of disposed cooking oil collected to 90 tons by December 2016, and employ two new women in 2017.

Climate Impact: Used cooking oil is a problematic waste. Its inadequate disposal can result in harmful environmental impacts, by hindering sewage treatment and polluting ecosystems. In 2015 we collected 34 tons of waste cooking oil (WCO) and produced 30,473 liters of biodiesel. Biodiesel made of WCO produces 86% less greenhouse than petro-diesel. Our project has facilitated the home recycling of 2,084 houses. By 2016 it is planned to withdraw 102 tons of WCO, avoiding the contamination of 102.564 million liters of water, and producing 92,304 liters of biodiesel. This will prevent the emission of 246 tons of CO2 compared to petro-diesel.

Gender Impact: The objective is to empower women victims of gender violence economically and improve their living conditions and consequently the livehoods of their families. Otro tiempo provides training and income to women, offering them an opportunity to rebuild their lives. In 2015, the association has been able to hire three women, and expects to hire seven women by 2018.

Scalability /replicability: All the different steps and methodology for collecting waste cooking oil can be replicated very easily. There are three main steps: 1. Distribute bottles and containers at the collection points 2. During the distribution, conduct awareness raising on climate change and educate on the fight against gender-based violence. 3. The oil is delivered in containers and transported to the treatment unit for the production of biodiesel.

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Solar home lighting systems promoted by indigenous young women in their tribal communities

Description of the project: The project trains indigenous young women to install solar photovoltaic systems for indoor lighting in tribal homes of the forest area of Wayanad – India. RASTA cooperates with the Barefoot College women of Rajasthan to train young women from a tribal community on installing and operating photovoltaic lamps. After the training, the young women conduct installations in their community, and motivate the community to contribute with a small fee for ongoing and future maintenance. The major beneficiaries are school children and women, as the illuminated homes allow time for homework and keeps wild animals away.

Climate Impact: The photovoltaic systems, installed in 165 households of a remote forest area, have reduced the climate impact of the tribal community by approximately 16.5 tons of GHG. Their consumption of kerosene has been considerably reduced by around 10,000 liter per year. The lamps’ batteries can be returned, recycled and refitted, reducing the environmental impact of the project.

Gender Impact: The project’s committee consists of 80% women and the installations are carried out by trained tribal girls. The installation process attracts women, who are taking on a job traditionally done by men. The social recognition and the economic status of the female solar engineers have improved. As a consequence, dropouts of girls from school have been reduced and women have improved reading habits.

Scalability /replicability: RASTA identified the technical viability for community participation in the project. The role of RASTA is to transmit technical knowledge and to provide awareness training to beneficiaries. The project can be installed in any remote village.

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Bioloos: climate-friendly, sustainable gender responsive toilets

Description of the project: The project enables access to safe & sustainable sanitation to women and their families, school children and rail passengers. Women suffer disproportionately from lack of sanitation. Bioloo improves their security and dignity by providing gender- sensitive and climate-friendly affordable toilet systems. Banka Bioloo is a social enterprise founded by a woman, Manita Banka. She has implemented Bioloos in 2000 schools/households and 2000 trains; thus benefitting over 10000 adults, 50000 school children, and 60,000 daily train travellers.

Climate Impact: The bioloo disposes human waste in a 100% eco-friendly manner, saves energy and water (no flush toilet) and produces bio-gas. It treats the human waste as a resource that can be re-used, and removes the need for transport of the faeces. It prevents contamination of groundwater with pathogens, and does not require any external infrastructure. The bioloos are a great technical solution for climate mitigation and adaptation.

Gender Impact: The bioloo social enterprise is led by a woman working with grass-root communities, ensuring that women’s needs are taken into account. Women are the biggest beneficiaries of the bioloo as it is documented that lack of sanitation exposes women to violence and health risks, and reduces their access to school. Women are consulted at the starting phase and are active partners in the project implementation. Financial support is organized for poor women-headed households. Banka BioLoo works to create programs and projects towards advancement of women.

Scalability /replicability: Banka BioLoo’s model is scalable and replicable across geographical areas or terrains; suited for all income groups and social backgrounds; for urban, peri-urban and rural areas; beaches; or hilly areas – almost anywhere. The bacteria used can withstand temperatures from -5°C to 50°C. Since 2012, the social enterprise has installed bioloos in 20 Indian states and has developed partnerships with other organisations. Bioloo is currently working on ways to take the bio-digester technology to other countries, such as in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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